Trail Times Year in Review: May

The year that was 2022. Photo: UnsplashThe year that was 2022. Photo: Unsplash
Scott Leyland shares his gorgeous photo showing the breathtaking beauty of the Columbia Basin. “Each spring, the balsam flowers between the Montrose cutoff and Waneta highway below, splash brilliance across a small meadow near Trail,” Leyland said.Scott Leyland shares his gorgeous photo showing the breathtaking beauty of the Columbia Basin. “Each spring, the balsam flowers between the Montrose cutoff and Waneta highway below, splash brilliance across a small meadow near Trail,” Leyland said.
On Saturday, a 12-metre section of retaining wall crumbled onto Daniel Street.On Saturday, a 12-metre section of retaining wall crumbled onto Daniel Street.
Miss Trail Rannde Wyatt (right) and Miss Trail Princess Esther Lawe.Miss Trail Rannde Wyatt (right) and Miss Trail Princess Esther Lawe.
Chris Reid (top left) is with Faith Woods from Mission Partners International and Pastor Roman with his wife Christina who are processing immigration paperwork for displaced Ukrainians in Poland.Chris Reid (top left) is with Faith Woods from Mission Partners International and Pastor Roman with his wife Christina who are processing immigration paperwork for displaced Ukrainians in Poland.
Zack Cure (left) from Trail was the first customer at the 7-Eleven soft opening on Friday, May 20 and is welcomed by 7-11 employee Manjinder.Zack Cure (left) from Trail was the first customer at the 7-Eleven soft opening on Friday, May 20 and is welcomed by 7-11 employee Manjinder.

May 2022

— After almost 50 years at the helm of the iconic Glenmerry Bowl, owner Ron Sandnes is retiring. Sandnes moved from Vancouver Island to Trail when he bought the bowling alley and took possession on Feb. 1, 1974. The Sandnes’ were able to leave the popular Trail bowling alley in good hands, selling the business to the Ferraro family, who have big plans for the bowling centre.

— The Trail Times was contacted by a family member of a cancer patient currently undergoing treatment at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital, under the care of Dr. Len Scotland. After decades of dedicated service to countless patients and their families, Dr. Scotland is soon to retire. To date, there is not a dedicated oncologist that will collectively take over care of cancer patients in the Trail area.

— Confirmation that 37 new child care spaces will be coming to the Village of Fruitvale is a welcome result following years of planning by advocates and elected officials working toward a common goal — helping families with growing needs in the midst of what is locally dubbed a “child care desert.”

— A Trail man who was No. 2 on the list of Canada’s 25 most-wanted fugitives has died in a plane crash in Ontario. The Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit said Tuesday (May 3) that Gene Karl Lahrkamp of Trail, B.C. was one of four people who died when a small plane crashed Saturday (April 30) near Sioux Lookout in northwestern Ontario.

— Fortunately no one was hurt when an historic rock wall in West Trail crumbled to the street a few days ago. The city reports that on Saturday, May 7, a 12-metre section of a retaining wall in the 2100 block of Daniel Street failed, blocking through traffic on the lower section of road. There were no reports of injury or private property damage, however lower Daniel Street remained blocked by debris as of Monday press time.

— “Reflecting on Community,” the city’s well-rounded summary of all things Trail for the year of 2020, has won an award for annual financial reporting.

— Following a night of showcasing all they’ve learned over seven months, the Trail ambassadors’ pageant culminated in the crowning of new royalty; Miss Trail Rannde Wyatt and Miss Trail Princess Esther Lawe.

— When Trail homeowners open up their property tax bill later this month, they’ll see the amount owed this year is up 4.5 per cent over 2021.

— Police are warning locals to stay vigilant with bear smart practices after a huge bruin broke into a Trail home on the weekend. The call of a black bear breaking into a house on Lookout Street came into the Trail detachment Sunday morning. The RCMP say the bear had broken several glass panels trying to gain entrance. Garbage was strewn about the property, the animal may have become habituated to non-natural food sources.

— As the Russian invasion of Ukraine continues, the task of feeding, caring for, and sheltering more than 1.5 million people fleeing the country becomes more and more daunting. Which is why Gateway Christian Life Pastor Shaun Romano and parishioner Chris Reid of Trail travelled to Poland on March 16 in a humanitarian effort to help those impacted by the war and forced from their homes, while providing assistance for those who remain. The pair returned yet their humanitarian cause continues.

— With two new businesses opening on the city’s main drag this year — a 7-Eleven gas bar and car wash and Dairy Queen Restaurant — locals may be wondering if there will be an adequate work force to keep these enterprises running smoothly and uninterrupted. After all, across the province a labour shortage is present or looming as British Columbia relaxes COVID-19 restrictions, leaving businesses scrambling to hire in what was already a tight labour market. “We don’t have data to support this, but anecdotally local employers are struggling to fill these jobs,” said Jaime Malcolm, programs manager for the Skills Centre

— Serving 87 households from Balfour to Castlegar and through to Trail, Rossland and the Beaver Valley — the West Kootenay EcoSociety’s Farms to Friends program will continue to deliver fresh food weekly to families and seniors throughout the Kootenays.

— Beaver Valley Citizen of the Year Committee announces a posthumous award to Bill Thompson as 2022 Citizen of the Year. “Bill’s passion, dedication and time commitment has served the Beaver Valley community very well. Our only wish is that we could have given Bill this very deserving recognition while he was with us.” Bill passed away on Oct. 6, 2021. His family will accept the award on his behalf.

— Zack Cure was the first customer at the new Trail 7-Eleven store’s soft opening on Friday, May 20. Cure says he planned to be the first customer and showed up a little before the scheduled 7:11 a.m. opening. “I thought it would be a great experience as well a great part of history,” Cure told the Times. “My first purchase was a Red Bull and I received a warm welcome from the staff.”

— The section of the Columbia River north of the U.S. border has not seen native migratory salmon in its waters since the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam in the 1930s. However, recent reports on social media and to the Trail Times indicate salmon may indeed be back. “Chinook Salmon are being encountered in recreational fisheries in the Columbia River between the US-Canada border and the Hugh Keenleyside Dam,” confirmed a ministry spokesperson.

— Interior Health has reopened Nelson’s Kootenay Lake Hospital to non-essential visitors. The hospital had closed to all but essential visitors, such as those visiting palliative patients, earlier in the week following COVID-19 exposures. Data released Thursday shows 540 people in the province hospitalized with the virus, 49 are in intensive care units.

— Interior Health has declared a COVID-19 outbreak on the medical unit at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital. As of May 26, the health authority says there are 15 cases connected to the outbreak.

— A new “Flood of 69” sign will soon be installed in the Gulch near the bocci pit after Trail council granted the Rossland Streamkeepers $580 at the May 25 council meeting. The cash will be used to replace the original sign that was stolen by vandals last fall.

— Canada and the United States continue to negotiate the modernization of the Columbia River Treaty, as delegations with both sides have met informally four times this spring to advance the discussions.

City of TrailKootenay Boundary Regional DistrictLocal BusinessRossland