Trail Times Year in Review: September

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This captivating photo is courtesy of Trail adventurer Brenda Haley. She snapped this picture of her hiking group during a West Kootenay trek up the Moraine Trail to Horseshoe Glacier (Sept. 1).This captivating photo is courtesy of Trail adventurer Brenda Haley. She snapped this picture of her hiking group during a West Kootenay trek up the Moraine Trail to Horseshoe Glacier (Sept. 1).
On May 5, 1971, the Queen, Princess Anne and Prince Philip spent time in Castlegar for British Columbia’s Centennial year and the opening of Selkirk College. Queen Elizabeth died Sept. 8. at Balmoral Castle in Scotland at the age of 96. Photo: Trail Historical SocietyOn May 5, 1971, the Queen, Princess Anne and Prince Philip spent time in Castlegar for British Columbia’s Centennial year and the opening of Selkirk College. Queen Elizabeth died Sept. 8. at Balmoral Castle in Scotland at the age of 96. Photo: Trail Historical Society
To memorialize lives lost to overdose, purple chairs have been placed around Trail at: Good Stuff/Kootenay West Distilling (pictured); Trail Association for Community Living/Career Development Services office; Riverfront Centre/Trail library; Hall Printing; Mills Office Productivity; Threads; Trail Coffee Company; and JJ’s Fashions. Photo: Sheri RegnierTo memorialize lives lost to overdose, purple chairs have been placed around Trail at: Good Stuff/Kootenay West Distilling (pictured); Trail Association for Community Living/Career Development Services office; Riverfront Centre/Trail library; Hall Printing; Mills Office Productivity; Threads; Trail Coffee Company; and JJ’s Fashions. Photo: Sheri Regnier
At six-years old, Escher Soto-Brown already has considerable hands-on experience with growing blooms around the city, having helped Trail Communities in Bloom plant the rainbow garden in Jubilee Park this year as well as the new lilacs that Trail Rotary donated in Rotary Park. Photo: SubmittedAt six-years old, Escher Soto-Brown already has considerable hands-on experience with growing blooms around the city, having helped Trail Communities in Bloom plant the rainbow garden in Jubilee Park this year as well as the new lilacs that Trail Rotary donated in Rotary Park. Photo: Submitted
L-R: Angelika Brunner, constituency assistant for Kootenay-West MLA Katrine Conroy; Myrt Servatius, Kootenay South Métis Society, president; Robert Cacchioni, Trail council; Carol Dobie, councillor incumbent for Trail; Toni Driutti, SD20 Area 3 ; Talia Verigin, SD20 Area I/J; Catherine Zaitsoff, incumbent trustee, chair SD20; incumbent Area 5 trustee Gordon Smith; Katherine Shearer, superintendent SD20; Trail (Area 4) trustee incumbents Mark Wilson and Terry Hanik. Photo: Sheri RegnierL-R: Angelika Brunner, constituency assistant for Kootenay-West MLA Katrine Conroy; Myrt Servatius, Kootenay South Métis Society, president; Robert Cacchioni, Trail council; Carol Dobie, councillor incumbent for Trail; Toni Driutti, SD20 Area 3 ; Talia Verigin, SD20 Area I/J; Catherine Zaitsoff, incumbent trustee, chair SD20; incumbent Area 5 trustee Gordon Smith; Katherine Shearer, superintendent SD20; Trail (Area 4) trustee incumbents Mark Wilson and Terry Hanik. Photo: Sheri Regnier

September 2022

— As families prepare for the start of the school year, the province has released guidelines for preventing COVID transmission in schools. This will be the third school year impacted by the pandemic. Efforts to curb in-school transmission will rely heavily on vaccination and students staying home when they are sick. Students will not be required to wear masks and the province is not bringing back the cohort system or staggered start times seen earlier in the pandemic.

— Husky gas station in Trail will take on new ownership mid-month as will the Husky station in Nelson. Chris Sapriken, general manager of Slocan Valley Co-operation Association, has confirmed the Slocan Valley Co-op purchased the two Husky retail fuel locales with official ownership going into play Sept. 13.

— People in Trail may have noticed purple chairs dotting our downtown. What do they mean? Purple is the colour used to recognize the toxic drug supply that is killing people all over the world. The empty chair is there to commemorate loved ones missing from our dinner tables, lost to toxic drugs.

— Mountain ecosystems are especially sensitive to climate change, so Living Lakes Canada is undertaking a high elevation monitoring program in the West Kootenay. The program began monitoring in Kokanee Glacier Provincial Park to track and log the changes in water levels. The citizen science initiative is asking residents heading into the park to support Living Lakes Canada in creating an inventory of plant and animal species within the park boundaries.

— Residents living in Silver City Gardens will no longer receive a once-daily prepared meal or once-weekly housekeeping services. The Trail Times was contacted by a family member worried about the impact these service losses will have on the tenants. The Times contacted Carey Fraser, executive director for CMHA Kootenays. She explained that there was no cut to funding that lead to the stopping of these particular services. Rather, these “hospitality services” were paid for through tenant fees.

— From now and until general voting day on Oct. 15, local politics in Rossland, Trail and the Beaver Valley will certainly be at the forefront of news as a very long list of candidates have thrown their hats into the mayoral and councillor ring.

— Trail RCMP are investigating an attempted murder after a vehicle explosion left a 41-year-old Montrose man with life-threatening injuries. The RCMP ‘E’ Division Explosive Device Unit, Nelson RCMP Forensic Identification Section, and Southeast District General Investigation Section are assisting Trail RCMP with the investigation.

— Many may have experienced an unexpected welling of emotion when the news broke on Thursday that Queen Elizabeth had died. To honour the Queen, Addison Oberg of the Trail Museum and Archives, forwarded a special historical feature for our Tuesday edition. On May 5, 1971, the Queen, Princess Anne and Prince Philip spent time in Castlegar for British Columbia’s Centennial year and the opening of Selkirk College. They were greeted by an estimated 10,000 person crowd, rain, and cold winds. Despite this, the crowd was jubilant and some were lucky enough to have conversations with the visiting royals. About 5,000 people were at the Castlegar airport to celebrate the arrival of the Royal’s plane. Once the aircraft had touched down, apparently the cheers were loud enough to be heard down at the college, over a mile away. The Queen signed off on the college’s register while cadets, boy scouts, girl scouts, the Trail Pipe Band and other groups paraded for the visiting dignitaries. A 104-person choir was also in attendance and sang Amazing Grace in both English and Russian. “While their visit to Castlegar was only 45 minutes long, the memories from the attending crowd have likely lasted a lifetime,” said Oberg.

— The response to several fires in the Southeast Fire Centre (SEFC) continued this week. Saturday morning, a blanket of thick smoke settled over most of the fire centre region, which encompasses the entire West Kootenay. While local fires are contributing, the SEFC says the majority of the smoke is coming from large fires that are burning in western Washington, Oregon, and the south coast of British Columbia.

— A supreme court judge has awarded Teck Metals upwards of $1.98M in damages in a lawsuit brought against the supplier of water treatment tanks, installed at the Trail plant, that were ultimately proven to be defective. Teck alleged the tanks failed “due to dangerous defects,” which allowed water to leak from them when filled. As key components of the $46M groundwater treatment plant built over two years and completed in 2017, the tanks were intended to store water containing ammonia, metals and sulphate.

— Provinces and businesses were left scrambling to react Tuesday after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Sept. 19 will be a federal holiday to mourn Queen Elizabeth II. While the announcement signalled that federal workers would get a day off on Monday, Sept. 19, the day of the Queen’s state funeral and of commemorative events across the country, provinces had to work out the details for other workplaces, including schools, with less than a week’s notice.

— On Sept. 13, at approximately 2 p.m., a commercial cement truck crashed at the Kootenay Bay Ferry terminal due to brake failure going down the hill. The driver was trapped in the vehicle until emergency responders arrived on scene and were able to cut open the roof. The driver was badly injured and airlifted to hospital via helicopter. The investigation has been turned over to WorkSafeBC.

— The new median at the Sunningdale ‘Y’ intersection has been completed, thereby improving pedestrian crossings and providing a safer traffic flow.

— Interior Health says a COVID-19 outbreak is over at Kootenay Lake Hospital.

— Years of championing for a new elementary school in Glenmerry finally became a reality Friday morning with an official groundbreaking in the expansive grassy field behind the old school.

— Only one electoral area in Kootenay Columbia School District 20 will see a vote for school trustee in the Oct. 15 civic election. All areas, with the exception of Area 6 (Fruitvale, Montrose), have only the same number of candidates as seats, meaning those candidates will take their seats by acclamation.

— More than six people died per day in B.C. from the poisoned drug supply in July, with the death of 190 adults and two children under the age of 19. The 192 deaths bring 2022’s total so far to 1,297. The BC Coroners Service says it’s seen a steady increase in the number of people over age 50 fatally overdosing.

— An All Candidates Forum has been scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 29 in the Trail Memorial Centre gym. There will be one forum for both Montrose and Fruitvale candidates on Oct. 4 in the Fruitvale hall.

— Police suspect the Sept. 9 car explosion in Montrose that injured a 41-year old man is linked to organized crime and drug trafficking in the West Kootenay. Investigators are consulting with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit as the inquiry is ongoing. A piece of metal from the explosion traveled a significant distance from the scene and passed through the corner of a house, narrowly missing the homeowner.

— Trophy Town: Local Heroes, International Legends will be broadcast across the country on The Sports Network (TSN) on Sept. 28. The documentary tells the story of the ‘39 and ‘61 Trail Smoke Eaters and their incredible gold medal victories at the World Ice Hockey Championships.

— A Trail RCMP officer responded to a frantic report of a black bear eating garbage inside a home in the Trail Gulch. Until police arrived and scared the bear away, the occupants hid from the bear inside locked rooms.

— From upgraded insulation to new heat pumps, 41 buildings with affordable rental housing will see their energy efficiency improve with nearly $6.1 million from Columbia Basin Trust’s Energy Retrofit Program.

— BC Hydro and several partners have begun habitat restoration work near the Hugh Keenleyside Dam and Arrow Lakes Generating Station in order to improve the chances of survival for larval white sturgeon. The project aims to enhance the spawning substrate for the endangered white sturgeon in the spawning area of the Arrow Lakes Generating Station.

— To recognize National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Friday, Sept. 30, the City of Trail is hosting an all-ages event in Jubilee Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guests are encouraged to wear orange and join an action walk.

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