Lana Rodlie, a Trail Historical Society volunteer (left) and Joyce Austin, the city’s collections coordinator, were in the archives on Tuesday, quietly focused on transcribing letters from the Great War. Content from the letters, written by a Trail soldier named Jim Schofield, will tell the story for the museum’s next exhibit, slated to open in October. Sheri Regnier photo

Lana Rodlie, a Trail Historical Society volunteer (left) and Joyce Austin, the city’s collections coordinator, were in the archives on Tuesday, quietly focused on transcribing letters from the Great War. Content from the letters, written by a Trail soldier named Jim Schofield, will tell the story for the museum’s next exhibit, slated to open in October. Sheri Regnier photo

‘Trailblazers’ coming to Riverfront Centre

Since opening four months ago, 32,000+ people have been to the Trail Riverfront Centre

The Trail Riverfront Centre continues to be a happening place for locals and visitors alike with more than 32,000 people walking through the front doors since it opened April 2.

Almost 6,000 of those visitors came to experience the Trail Museum and Archives and take in the current exhibit of the 1948 Trail flood, which opened in July. A full house (capacity of 40) came to listen to Ron Verzuh present his documentary “Codename Project 9” at the beginning of the month, which was the first in a series of historical lectures.

The second lecture titled “The Fascinating History of Early Trail: Some Trials and Tribulations of her Trailblazers,” slated for Sept. 12, will be presented by Trail native W.J. Sullivan, Q.C. (Queen’s Counsel).

The story is certainly unique to Trail and sure to include humour as guests learn about the relationships between city’s first residents, Colonel Topping and Frank and Mary Jane Hanna.

“Mr. Sullivan’s research shed new light on the tumultuous relationship between Trail’s founding fathers, Colonel Topping and Frank Hanna,” says museum manager Sarah Benson-Lord.

“And the woman who married them both, Mary Jane Hanna/Topping.”

Sullivan, who is a partner in the Vancouver law firm of Guild Yule LLP, received a Masters of Fine Arts degree in Creative Non-Fiction in 2017.

His grandparents came to Trail Creek Landing in 1896. His mother, and then he, were born and raised in Trail.

Space is limited for this event, which has a $5 entry fee. Anyone wishing to attend must register by calling 250.364.0829.

The partnership between the city and the Trail Historical Society (THS) continues to solidify, with board members and new volunteers making a concerted effort to have a presence in the facility, Benson-Lord reported to council last week.

“Guided tours, led by THS volunteers, began in July and are scheduled for Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons,” she said. “Where a THS volunteer is unavailable, summer students undertake the task. Volunteers are provided with a staff‐developed script and lead patrons on a one hour tour of the galleries.”

The Exhibit Committee is actively involved in the exhibit development process and meets regularly to review research, discuss ideas and assign tasks. The next exhibit will open on Oct. 15.

Upcoming projects include the installation of a third temporary exhibit, a professional collections appraisal in October, development of a mural on the retaining wall behind the facility, and transition of gift shop transactions and visitor inquiries from summer students to library staff.

 

‘Trailblazers’ coming to Riverfront Centre