Jim Clarkson from the city’s public works was on site Wednesday

Jim Clarkson from the city’s public works was on site Wednesday

Vehicle access around TMC halted during river wall repairs

Vehicle access is a no go, but those on foot can follow a delineated path around the facility’s perimeter.

The crumbling river wall on the east side of the Trail Memorial Centre is under repair for the next few weeks. So anyone needing a drop off by car in the building’s front entrance won’t be able to do so for the duration of the project, which is expected to be completed Aug. 8.

Vehicle access is a no go, but those on foot can follow a delineated path around the facility’s perimeter.

All motorists and pedestrians are asked to take caution when driving or walking near the area, explained Andrea Jolly, the city’s communication coordinator.

“Please obey all posted information,” she added, referring to information signage about temporary lane and sidewalk closures, posted speed limits and idle reduction notices.

City crews were on site Wednesday, tearing up asphalt along the approximately 60-foot section of the infrastructure project that once complete, includes installation of a new guard rail.

The repairs being undertaken were included in the 2015 capital budget for a total cost of $52,000.

“The project is being undertaken now to limit any disruption to the arena given that ice will be going in shortly,” said David Perehudoff, Trail’s chief administrative officer.

“The current repair has been identified for some time and will involve replacing the concrete cap and handrail.  In addition it will provide better protection of the fibre optic line that runs in this location.”

A separate river wall repair further south along the Esplanade near the Fortis building, is slated to begin this fall.

Trail council allotted $30,000 from surplus after an isolated area was identified during the city’s annual maintenance inspection a few years ago.

A concrete fracture and degraded cement became clearly visible following the creation of an unobstructed shoreline in 2013.

The large crack is at the control joint from a previous repair completed in 1969 following a historic flooding of the Trail Creek.

While the risk to public safety is deemed low, repairs are considered a high priority this year and expected to be completed this fall when Columbia River levels are low.