WEST NILE VIRUS – City taking steps to swat potential mosquito problem

To keep Trail as mosquito and West Nile virus free as possible, the city has again decided to apply the pesticide VectoLex to municipal storm sewer catch basins.

To keep Trail as mosquito and West Nile virus free as possible, the city has again decided to apply the pesticide VectoLex to municipal storm sewer catch basins.

The pesticide is only effective for mosquito larvae; which is why the city uses it in areas where standing water accumulates — that’s where female mosquitoes lay their eggs.

Councilor Gord DeRosa acknowledged that it’s in the best interest of public health to use a pesticide in this circumstance, but is still opposed to the use of the product.

“I understand that the easiest tool in the toolbox is the pesticide and herbicide application however, best use? Not in my mind.”

He has asked if the catch basins could be replaced with another system that would eliminate the standing water, but has been told that currently the basins need standing water to allow sand and sediment to settle before the water goes through a pipeline.

If and when the basins are replaced, DeRosa has been told that city would consider looking at getting something different, depending on what systems are available at the time.

DeRosa would like residents to become more engaged in removing standing water on their own property as well — dumping water out of buckets, wheelbarrows, and anything else that may attract mosquitoes.

“It’s the way of the future,” he said. “I think that the life of the use of the pesticide is going to dwindle and die — the provincial government now is restricting the sales of cosmetic herbicides and                        pesticides.”

“We’re just going to have to maybe get used to having yellow and white flowers in our lawns and gain an appreciation for clover and dandelions.”