Ann Godderis and Kelly Woods help each other pin on their ribbons as part of the international White Ribbon Campaign. Wearing a ribbon symbolizes a future free of violence against women. The Day of Remembrance and Action takes place on Dec. 6 at the Trail United Church Hall.

Ann Godderis and Kelly Woods help each other pin on their ribbons as part of the international White Ribbon Campaign. Wearing a ribbon symbolizes a future free of violence against women. The Day of Remembrance and Action takes place on Dec. 6 at the Trail United Church Hall.

White Ribbon campaign helps raise awareness

FAIR White Ribbon campaign helps raise awareness about violence against women and girls

Greater Trail residents may be donning a new ribbon with pride.

Trail Family and Individual Resource (FAIR) Centre Society has borrowed the international White Ribbon Campaign that encourages people to wear a white ribbon to make a personal pledge to never commit, condone or remain silent about violence against women and girls.

FAIR staffs were downtown Tuesday handing out the ribbons, a statement that also falls in line with the organization’s annual push during its 16 days of action to end violence against women, which ends Dec. 10.

Marking the anniversary of what’s known as the Montreal Massacre, FAIR is hosting an event Dec. 6 that will not only commemorate women who’ve suffered from violence but will open the floor to discussion on taking a proactive approach.

Locals are invited to take part in the Day of Remembrance and Action at the Trail United Church Hall at 5:30 p.m.

The action part of the evening will include presentations from violence prevention programs like the Boys Project, which connects young boys in the area with role models to promote inclusion, and Healthy Relationships/Dating Violence, a program geared toward Grade 7 students that touches on warning signs of violence and details on what makes a healthy relationship.

“It’s certainly clear that if young people understand that there are other ways to deal with conflict other than using violence, we’ve gone a long way to ending the issues of violence against women when people become adults,” said Godderis.

The event will also revisit a women’s safety recommendation list that was handed to the Downtown Opportunities and Action Committee this time last year.

“One of the main issues that was named in terms of safety for women is accessible, affordable, decent housing,” said Godderis.

“Because that’s often one of the biggest obstacles for women leaving a violent relationship.”

The local organization continues to support women leaving abusive relationships with the WINS Transition House, which has 10 beds.

FAIR also offers a second-stage program for women who have been in the transition house for the maximum time of 30 days. This six-suite complex gives women more time to heal in a safe, supportive environment for an affordable price.

Godderis said one of the greatest challenges for women leaving an abusive relationship is the fear of poverty.

“When the women leaves, unless she has a lot of family to support her, she is often living on social assistance and you can’t live on social assistance,” she said. “What we see is the husband blocking every possibility for the women to try to get either money for the kids and finally to get a divorce so she can get a settlement and get on with her life.”

Children are welcome to the free event, where childcare will be provided both before and after a complimentary light meal. A non-perishable food donation for the United Church and WINS Transition House food cupboards are welcomed.

For more information on FAIR visit, www.trailfair.ca