Notes left on Victoria cars tell motorists they ‘are the problem’ in the climate change issue. (Courtesy of Chantal CB)

Notes left on Victoria cars tell motorists they ‘are the problem’ in the climate change issue. (Courtesy of Chantal CB)

‘Your vehicle burns a lot of fuel:’ Victoria drivers wake up to angry notes

‘This handbill was left on your vehicle because your vehicle burns a lot of fuel,’ notes read

At least a handful of Victoria motorists woke up to angry notes on their vehicles Sunday morning, telling them, in bold letters: “You are the PROBLEM.”

Seemingly deposited by a climate change crusader, the notes tell drivers they received the handbill because their “vehicle burns a lot of fuel.”

READ ALSO: Nasty note on B.C. windshield sparks online outrage

“While thousands of us are on board, walking or riding bikes to work every day in an effort to minimize our carbon footprint, you have clearly missed the memo or don’t care,” the note reads. “When you see your kids, nieces, nephews grandchildren; the people to who you are passing the world onto. I suggest you tell them to their face that you hate them. After all, you are helping to deprive them of food security and biodiversity, among other critical things.”

The notes have reportedly shown up on cars in the Oak Bay, Fairfield and Rockland neighbourhoods.

Notes left on Victoria vehicles Saturday night tell motorists they have either ‘missed the memo’ or ‘clearly don’t care’ about climate change. (Courtesy of Chantal CB)

Fairfield resident Leslie Wilson said one of the flyers was on the windshield of her husband’s truck Sunday morning.

“I was kind of amazed to read it, it’s pretty judgmental,” she said. “They have no idea what our lives are like or anything about us.”

Wilson believes the aggressive anonymous notes will do little to bolster support for the creator’s cause.

“Legitimate groups tend to leave a name or contact information, as well as information that is positive and useful,” she says. “It’s not going to work, it’s not the kind of message people are going to take to heart or make changes based on. It just aggravates people.”

READ ALSO: Dead rats on doorstep greets Summerland mayor

Oak Bay resident Chantal CB agrees, writing via Facebook that while there is always room for improvement, “this form of communication is not effective at actually making change happen.”

“It shuts otherwise open and receptive people, down. I’m rational, educated, and care about my children and their future but I am more offended by this form of shaming, which makes huge assumptions about our family,” she said. “Give me facts, show me a better way that I can effect change within my financial means, and I’ll make change.”



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

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