Photo: CWF

Photo: CWF

Monarchs Need the Right of Way

The fate of this beloved species lies in the united conservation efforts

The U.S. government’s recent decision not to list the Monarch Butterfly under the Endangered Species Act means that more citizens and corporations on both sides of the border need to work together to build pollinator pathways along critical migratory corridors.

Although they won’t be listing this species under the Endangered Species Act in the immediate future, the U.S. government has signed unprecedented voluntary conservation agreements with rights-of-way entities to help recover the Monarch.

The fate of this beloved species lies in the united conservation efforts of Canada, the U.S. and Mexico.

There is a critical need for volunteer conservation action such as restoring habitat along rights-of-way and planting native wildflower gardens.”

Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) is launching the development of a national network of Rights of Way managers, with a special focus on virtual collaboration with American counterparts.

CWF will provide expert advice on restoration methods to create pollinator-friendly rights-of-way including a multi-year vegetation management plan for the Eastern Ontario pilot zone and advice in integrated vegetation management to reduce the coverage of alien invasive plant species.

A scientific monitoring and evaluation program to assess ecological results of the restoration activities is also planned.

CWF also continues to encourage Canadian landowners to transform portions of their mowed lawns into pollinator habitat.

There are about 6.2 million lawns in Canada.

Converting just one-quarter of each lawn to a native wildflower meadow would equal around 14,400 hectares of habitat for Monarch and other pollinators.

For more information visit HelpthePollinators.ca.

By Carolyn Callaghan, CWF senior conservation manager, terrestrial wildlife.

About the Canadian Wildlife Federation:

The Canadian Wildlife Federation is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes and co-operating with like-minded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians can live in harmony with nature. Visit CanadianWildlifeFederation.ca for more information.

Environment

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