Recycling stays at landfill, future of reuse centre uncertain

An assortment of challenges at RDKB landfills has regional directors asking staff to look for alternatives.

Due diligence has the regional district examining two of the “3 R’s” (reduce, reuse, recycle) this year – recycling services and reuse centres (RC).

An assortment of challenges at Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB) landfills had regional directors asking staff to investigate alternatives such as moving MMBC (Multi Materials BC) recycle depots in Trail and Grand Forks, and to address the “Share Shed” (RCs) muddle at both locations.

After exploring the feasibility of transferring recycle depots from high traffic RDKB facilities, like the McKelvey Creek locale, to private or not-for-profit sectors, the board agreed with staff findings during the Thursday regional meeting.

Regional recycling services will stay put, for now.

“The question that came from elected officials was if it was possible for us to essentially shut down our recycling depot and move it to the private sector,” explains John McLean, RDKB chief administrative officer.

The incentives being cost reduction, clearing congestion at the landfill sites, and addressing staffing issues.

The RDKB received about $20,000 from MMBC last year for hosting the McKelvey Creek and Grand Forks landfill recycling depots, according to a report by Tim Dueck, coordinator for the solid waste program.

Dueck noted MMBC funding does not cover the cost of infrastructure or staffing required to adequately ensure a clean materials product.

Additionally, he reported conversations with various businesses and agencies in both cities revealed uncertainty about the business case of becoming an MMBC host and safety concerns related to an increase of traffic in respective store fronts.

“The report came back and said, ‘No,’” McLean clarified. “So when it comes to the Trail recycling depot, the action was to do nothing,” he added. “Grand Forks was different – there were two. One at the fire hall and one and the landfill – and we shut down one at the fire hall (Feb. 1).”

Due diligence has the regional district examining two of the “3 R’s” (reduce, reuse, recycle) this year – recycling services and reuse centres (RC).

An assortment of challenges at Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB) landfills had regional directors asking staff to investigate alternatives such as moving MMBC (Multi Materials BC) recycle depots in Trail and Grand Forks, and to address the “Share Shed” (RCs) muddle at both locations.

After exploring the feasibility of transferring recycle depots from high traffic RDKB facilities, like the McKelvey Creek locale, to private or not-for-profit sectors, the board agreed with staff findings during the Thursday regional meeting.

Regional recycling services will stay put, for now.

“The question that came from elected officials was if it was possible for us to essentially shut down our recycling depot and move it to the private sector,” explains John McLean, RDKB chief administrative officer.

The incentives being cost reduction, clearing congestion at the landfill sites, and addressing staffing issues.

The RDKB received about $20,000 from MMBC last year for hosting the McKelvey Creek and Grand Forks landfill recycling depots, according to a report by Tim Dueck, coordinator for the solid waste program.

Dueck noted MMBC funding does not cover the cost of infrastructure or staffing required to adequately ensure a clean materials product.

Additionally, he reported conversations with various businesses and agencies in both cities revealed uncertainty about the business case of becoming an MMBC host and safety concerns related to an increase of traffic in respective store fronts.

“The report came back and said, ‘No,’” McLean clarified. “So when it comes to the Trail recycling depot, the action was to do nothing,” he added. “Grand Forks was different – there were two. One at the fire hall and one and the landfill – and we shut down one at the fire hall (Feb. 1).”