Seven-year-old Dezra Kuchar met with Warfield Mayor Bert Crockett during the village’s coffee with council Monday to affix one of the first bright yellow flower pins this year.

Seven-year-old Dezra Kuchar met with Warfield Mayor Bert Crockett during the village’s coffee with council Monday to affix one of the first bright yellow flower pins this year.

Symbol of hope spreading in bunches

A sign of spring is starting to crop up as Canadian Cancer Society volunteers plant their Daffodil Days’ campaign.

A sign of spring is starting to crop up as Canadian Cancer Society volunteers plant their Daffodil Days’ campaign efforts throughout Greater Trail.

The annual fundraising drive has been well underway with businesses pre-ordering fresh bunches of daffodils that will be delivered March 20, at which time the $5 bouquets can be picked up by the public.

From March 20-22, volunteers will be at Ferraro Foods, Shoppers Drug Mart, Waneta Plaza and Walmart in Trail and Liberty Foods in Fruitvale pushing petals.

By-donation daffodil pins, a bright symbol of strength and courage that can be worn throughout April (Daffodil Month),  are also circulating throughout the local communities.

Campaign chair Deborah Shergold and her granddaughter Dezra Kuchar, 7, met with Warfield council during the village’s coffee with council Monday to affix the very first bright yellow flower pins.

“I really want to thank all my volunteers who have stuck with me these past five years, these are the people that make it happen year after year,” said Shergold, who started with the Canadian Cancer Society 14 years ago (spending half her time in Vancouver before bringing her energy to Trail).

Trail gave $8,100 last year and this year Shergold would like to see the bar lifted to $10,000.

The funds raised not only go to research, but to support programs for people living with cancer and their caretakers.

“I have seen firsthand, my three-year-old step-grandson diagnosed last year with Wilms’ Tumour, the struggle, and the heartbreak of seeing a child go through chemo and the needles,” she shared. “But, I also saw the support system that the Cancer Society had not only for the child but for the parents, siblings and grandparents.”

She’s happy to report that he’s cancer free today.

It’s never to late or too early to help out, she said. Her granddaughter’s commitment was awarded two years ago, when at five she went door to door with the pin campaign. Dezra will be wearing a daffodil and smile when she gives thanks to the many volunteers by serving at the “Daffodil Tea” March 31 from 2-4 p.m. a the Canadian Cancer Society office in the Gulch.

“I am a big believer in volunteering and also that if young children start with their families at a young age, they will continue as they grow up,” said Shergold. “Let’s face it, we really need our younger people to take over and help us; They are the future in so many ways.”

Businesses looking to pre-order their bunches can fax the Canadian Cancer Society office at 364-0430 no later than today for delivery on the 20th.