gardening

Rotary Park is looking particularly pretty and perennial with the addition of mulch. Photo: Rachael Brown

So ‘mulch’ fun in Trail park

If you have a recent photo to share email: editor@trailtimes.ca

 

This image provided by the USDA Agricultural Research Service shows a closeup of a mosquito on human skin. (USDA Agricultural Research Service via AP)

How to take your garden and yard back from the mosquitoes

Eliminating these biting pests from your yard will not adversely affect the ecosystem

 

Bloomin’ beauty
For Trail Community in Bloom (CiB) volunteers, it’s not just about the flowers. But, as one can see, the flowers are blooming beautiful this summer. Photos: Submitted by Trail CiB

Beautiful beds in bloom around Trail

Trail CiB volunteers have been busy tending to garden beds

 

The Hills to Valley tour last went in July 2019, and showcased this gorgeous rose-filled garden. Photo: Hills to Garden Facebook page

From Rossland to the Beaver Valley, garden and art tour returns

For more info visit: www.facebook.com/kootenaygardentour

The Hills to Valley tour last went in July 2019, and showcased this gorgeous rose-filled garden. Photo: Hills to Garden Facebook page
Caroline Collier teaches a Wildflower student how to plant wildflower seeds. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

Creston students learn about pollinator gardens

Caroline Collier is planting flowers on behalf of the bees

Caroline Collier teaches a Wildflower student how to plant wildflower seeds. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Photo: Unsplash

Regenerating our disappearing soil

Much of the area we have chosen for our new garden is dirt - not soil. And there’s a big difference.

Photo: Unsplash
L-R: Allana Ferro, auxiliary president, along with volunteers Sandy and Geri, presented the donation to this project to Ruth Kohut, KBRH director of clinical operations and KBRH foundation board member; and John Sullivan, KBRH foundation board chair. Photo: Submitted

Trail auxiliary helps grow hospital garden

The KBRH Garden Project ensures that hospital grounds are warm and welcoming.

L-R: Allana Ferro, auxiliary president, along with volunteers Sandy and Geri, presented the donation to this project to Ruth Kohut, KBRH director of clinical operations and KBRH foundation board member; and John Sullivan, KBRH foundation board chair. Photo: Submitted
Community gardeners Marlene Nash, Serena Naeve, Sally Malner, Jackie Kuetbach pose next the new sign painted by artist Beth Swalwell. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

Creston’s Community Garden embraces global village philosophy

A new garden sign painted by a local artist reflects unity, inclusivity

Community gardeners Marlene Nash, Serena Naeve, Sally Malner, Jackie Kuetbach pose next the new sign painted by artist Beth Swalwell. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Flowers

Slow flowers

Growing sustainability in the floral industry

  • Mar 14, 2022
Flowers
Columnist Mary Lowther is making her own Christmas gifts with a little help from the garden. Photo: Metro Creative

Mary Lowther column: Making gifts from the garden

Spoiler alert for my family: if you want to be surprised, read no further!

  • Dec 12, 2021
Columnist Mary Lowther is making her own Christmas gifts with a little help from the garden. Photo: Metro Creative
Seasoned gardeners at Mountain Side Village in Fruitvale bought many plants from local sources to grow this season. But this particular bounty of purple tomatoes, called the Indigo Rose, is something new to them. Photos: Submitted

Perplexed by a purple tomato? Learn about the ‘Indigo Rose’

Indigo Rose is a new breed of cherry-tomato that contains anthocyanin

Seasoned gardeners at Mountain Side Village in Fruitvale bought many plants from local sources to grow this season. But this particular bounty of purple tomatoes, called the Indigo Rose, is something new to them. Photos: Submitted
Butchart Gardens - Handout

Creating the Japanese Garden

A place to think, meditate and be at peace

  • Aug 11, 2021
Butchart Gardens - Handout
Morris Flowers has offered some advice on gardening in the Creston Valley. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

The best plants to add to your garden this year

Morris Flowers Garden Center offered some suggestions for creating visual interest

Morris Flowers has offered some advice on gardening in the Creston Valley. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
The Fruitvale community garden is located on Beaver Street across from the municipal office. Photo: Submitted

Harvest Central Community Garden opens in Fruitvale

A growing opportunity for all Beaver Valley residents, from kindergarten and upwards

The Fruitvale community garden is located on Beaver Street across from the municipal office. Photo: Submitted
A native-to-B.C. wild queen bee (bombus melanopygus for those in the know) feeds on a periwinkle flower. (Submitted/Sarah Johnson, Native Bee Society of BC)

B.C.’s wild bees need messy gardens to survive

The year-long nesting period makes habitat a primary concern for wild bees

A native-to-B.C. wild queen bee (bombus melanopygus for those in the know) feeds on a periwinkle flower. (Submitted/Sarah Johnson, Native Bee Society of BC)
B.C. beekeepers will face extra supply challenges this year thanks to COVID-19 supply chain disruptions. (Black Press Media file photo)

B.C. bee supply threatened this year by wasps, COVID

No, bees aren’t getting COVID, it’s the supply chain that’s been disrupted

B.C. beekeepers will face extra supply challenges this year thanks to COVID-19 supply chain disruptions. (Black Press Media file photo)
Protecting sacred Camas
“Indigenous community leader Kim Robertson and CiB teamed up to protect the stand of camas that grows along the waters edge near Gyro Park,” says Rachael Brown. “After many of the bulbs were removed last year, we covered a large section of the stand with chicken wire. This allows the plant to grow through while impeding any shovels looking to dig down. Next for the camas is proper signage.” Common camas is a native perennial herb in the lily family. The beautiful blue flowers grow in moist meadows in southern B.C. Camas is a rare find in the Columbia Basin, restricted to low-elevation sites in the West Kootenay. Camas was a dietary staple for Indigenous peoples wherever it grew, and is a cultural keystone species. Photo: Submitted

Trail’s blooming volunteers are back for a 19th season

Dan Rodlie remains chair of the Trail CiB committee this season

Protecting sacred Camas
“Indigenous community leader Kim Robertson and CiB teamed up to protect the stand of camas that grows along the waters edge near Gyro Park,” says Rachael Brown. “After many of the bulbs were removed last year, we covered a large section of the stand with chicken wire. This allows the plant to grow through while impeding any shovels looking to dig down. Next for the camas is proper signage.” Common camas is a native perennial herb in the lily family. The beautiful blue flowers grow in moist meadows in southern B.C. Camas is a rare find in the Columbia Basin, restricted to low-elevation sites in the West Kootenay. Camas was a dietary staple for Indigenous peoples wherever it grew, and is a cultural keystone species. Photo: Submitted
Reiner Jakubowski American Peony Society Registrar Nomenclature has named his latest Creation Castlegar. Photo: submitted

New peony hybrid named for Castlegar

Reiner Jakubowski has named his latest peony creation after Castlegar.

Reiner Jakubowski American Peony Society Registrar Nomenclature has named his latest Creation Castlegar. Photo: submitted
A new West Coast Seeds pollinator mix of cosmos pays tribute to Dr. Bonnie Henry. (Submitted photo/ We Are The Northern)

New blend by West Coast Seeds to bloom in Dr. Bonnie Henry’s name

Cosmo blend designed to attract bees, and marketed with tagline ‘Bee Calm, Bee Kind, Bee Safe’

A new West Coast Seeds pollinator mix of cosmos pays tribute to Dr. Bonnie Henry. (Submitted photo/ We Are The Northern)
Planting for a year round harvest

Planting for a year round harvest

The mid-July sowings produce crops that will become large enough to take them through the winter

  • Jun 9, 2020
Planting for a year round harvest