HIV/AIDS

A woman walks by a sign during the AIDS 2022 conference in Montreal, Sunday, July 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Federal government announces $18M for HIV testing at Montreal AIDS conference

Number of Canadians living with HIV has risen by 25 per cent since 2008, says advocacy organization

 

Marina Klein, Research Director and Professor of Medicine at the Division of Infectious Diseases at McGill University, left, and Sharon Lewin, International AIDS Society President-Elect speak during a roundtable discussion on monkeypox the AIDS 2022 conference in Montreal, Sunday, July 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Monkeypox: Experts at AIDS conference say the current global response is not enough

803 cases of the virus have been reported in Canada as of July 29

 

From left to right, U2 singer Bono, Philanthropist and Co-Chairman of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Bill Gates, and France’s President Emmanuel Macron congratulate each other on stage during the Global Fund to Fight AIDS event at the Lyon’s congress hall, central France, Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Laurent Cipriani

Advocates say Canada should commit $1.2 billion to fight against AIDS, TB and malaria

Investment, with other countries’ help, could save 20 million lives over next few years: advocates

 

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Sean Fraser rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, June 10, 2022. Last week, almost 250 AIDS organizations from around the world sent a joint letter to Immigration Minister Sean Fraser calling on him to take action to ensure participants can attend the International AIDS conference in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

People planning to attend AIDS conference in Montreal still struggling to get visas

Applicants from Africa, Asia, South America being denied access

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Sean Fraser rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, June 10, 2022. Last week, almost 250 AIDS organizations from around the world sent a joint letter to Immigration Minister Sean Fraser calling on him to take action to ensure participants can attend the International AIDS conference in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Laurie Edmiston is executive director of CATIE, Canada’s source for HIV and hepatitis C information.

HIV funding down in Canada, HIV infections up

December 1 is World AIDS Day

  • Nov 25, 2021
Laurie Edmiston is executive director of CATIE, Canada’s source for HIV and hepatitis C information.
National HIV Testing Day is June 27. (Wikimedia Commons photo)

Study looks at how HIV self-tests can help queer people overcome health-care hurdles

Study will send 15,000 free self-test kits to participants across Canada to either use themselves or share with others

National HIV Testing Day is June 27. (Wikimedia Commons photo)
Funds will be raised through a virtual concert on April 15 showcasing Canadian talent. Image: Grans to Grans

Trail Grans to Grans invites locals to virtual fundraising concert

90 minutes of music, dance, storytelling, and drumming will stream April 15

Funds will be raised through a virtual concert on April 15 showcasing Canadian talent. Image: Grans to Grans
CATIE is Canadas source for HIV and hepatitis information. Photo: Catie.ca

Is an HIV resurgence looming in Canada?

Opinion: Laurie Edmiston is executive director of CATIE

  • Nov 17, 2020
CATIE is Canadas source for HIV and hepatitis information. Photo: Catie.ca
Dr. Sean Rourke is shown in this undated image. PHOTO BY UNITY HEALTH TORONTO/YURI MARKAROV/HANDOUT /THE CANADIAN PRESS

Canada approves first HIV self-test in long-awaited move to reduce screening barriers

Canada follows dozens of other countries in greenlighting the technology

Dr. Sean Rourke is shown in this undated image. PHOTO BY UNITY HEALTH TORONTO/YURI MARKAROV/HANDOUT /THE CANADIAN PRESS
FILE – Jane Greer of the Hassle Free Clinic, unboxes an HIV self-testing kit in Toronto on Wednesday, August 7, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

COVID-19 underscores need for Canada to approve HIV self-tests, says researcher

COVID-19 pandemic has compounded the barriers many people face to getting tested for HIV in clinical settings

FILE – Jane Greer of the Hassle Free Clinic, unboxes an HIV self-testing kit in Toronto on Wednesday, August 7, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin
FILE - This May 16, 2011 photo shows Timothy Ray Brown with his dog, Jack, on Treasure Island in San Francisco. Brown, who was known for years as the Berlin patient, had a transplant in Germany from a donor with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown’s leukemia and HIV. But in an interview Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, Brown said his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. His case has inspired scientists to seek more practical ways to try to cure the disease. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

First man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

Brown’s first transplant in 2007 was followed by a second in 2008

FILE - This May 16, 2011 photo shows Timothy Ray Brown with his dog, Jack, on Treasure Island in San Francisco. Brown, who was known for years as the Berlin patient, had a transplant in Germany from a donor with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown’s leukemia and HIV. But in an interview Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, Brown said his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. His case has inspired scientists to seek more practical ways to try to cure the disease. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Ontario’s top court rejected arguments that condom use is a sure fire way to prevent transmission of the virus that can lead to AIDS, upholding an aggravated assault conviction against an HIV-positive man who had protected intercourse with three women without telling them about his health status. Condoms are shown in Montreal, Nov. 30, 2006. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Adrian Wyld

Canadian man with HIV still guilty of aggravated sex assault despite condom use

Court said women may not have been as careful as they did not know the diagnosis

Ontario’s top court rejected arguments that condom use is a sure fire way to prevent transmission of the virus that can lead to AIDS, upholding an aggravated assault conviction against an HIV-positive man who had protected intercourse with three women without telling them about his health status. Condoms are shown in Montreal, Nov. 30, 2006. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Adrian Wyld