Wildlife

Photo: Ron Wilson
Photo: Ron Wilson

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it large or actual-size to editor@trailtimes.ca

 

Unscripted backyard performances often provide the best entertainment in the world, as Jim Merritt can attest to. Photo: Jim Merritt

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it large or actual size to editor@trailtimes.ca

 

A Canadian Pacific freight train travels around Morant’s Curve near Lake Louise, Alta., on Monday, Dec. 1, 2014. A study looking at 646 wildlife deaths along the railway tracks in Banff and Yoho national parks in Alberta and British Columbia has found that train speed is one of the biggest factors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Study finds train speed a top factor in wildlife deaths in Banff, Yoho national parks

Research concludes effective mitigation could address train speed and ability of wildlife to see trains

 

RCMP Cpl. Cory Lepine pictured at BC Livestock Producers Co. in Kamloops, Nov. 16. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)

Meet B.C.’s only cowboy cop; a voice for the livestock industry

Cpl. Cory Lepine serves as a bridge between the law and those who make a living off the land

RCMP Cpl. Cory Lepine pictured at BC Livestock Producers Co. in Kamloops, Nov. 16. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
A coyote (not the one pictured) is reported to have chased a group of teenagers into a downtown Trail eatery on Saturday. Photo: Caleb Woods on Unsplash

Trail police report problem coyote

Wildlife is still active in the Trail area, including bears and coyotes

A coyote (not the one pictured) is reported to have chased a group of teenagers into a downtown Trail eatery on Saturday. Photo: Caleb Woods on Unsplash
Wolverine in the wild. Photo: Gordon MacPherson KO

Wolverine research in the Kootenays boosted by citizen science

The project relies on citizen science observations collected online at Wolverine Watch platform

Wolverine in the wild. Photo: Gordon MacPherson KO
Photo:Ron Wilson

Knock on wood

If you have a recent photo to share email it large or actual-size to editor@trailtimes.ca

Photo:Ron Wilson
Redpolls, pine siskins, pine and evening grosbeaks (pictured), and sometimes crossbills (red or white-winged) are the most common “suicide birds.” They form small or large flocks during fall and winter and consider B.C. highways prime habitat during the worst of the year. Photo: Jim Merritt

Sound your horn to help save B.C. birds

Letter to the Editor from Gord DeRosa of Trail

  • Nov 5, 2020
Redpolls, pine siskins, pine and evening grosbeaks (pictured), and sometimes crossbills (red or white-winged) are the most common “suicide birds.” They form small or large flocks during fall and winter and consider B.C. highways prime habitat during the worst of the year. Photo: Jim Merritt
Annie a 21.2 lb bear cub showed up at the Stewart-Hyder border this morning and was captured and is now settling in at the Smithers Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter. (Canada Border Services Agency photo)

Bear cub tries to cross U.S.-Canada border, taken to wildlife shelter instead

Angelika Langen said “Annie” is in good health despite being only 21.2 lbs

Annie a 21.2 lb bear cub showed up at the Stewart-Hyder border this morning and was captured and is now settling in at the Smithers Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter. (Canada Border Services Agency photo)
Bats in B.C. help control agricultural and forest pests, as well as mosquitoes. Photo: Submitted

Bat Week soon lands – go to bat for bats!

Watch the Kootenay Community Bat Project Facebook page to learn about bats

Bats in B.C. help control agricultural and forest pests, as well as mosquitoes. Photo: Submitted
Province tracks potential deadly deer virus outbreak on Gulf Islands

Province tracks potential deadly deer virus outbreak on Gulf Islands

No known risk to human health from the virus

Province tracks potential deadly deer virus outbreak on Gulf Islands
Urban wildlife Part I: The East Kootenay birds of summer

Urban wildlife Part I: The East Kootenay birds of summer

The work of local photographers printed in the pages of the East Kootenay Advertiser over the summer of 2020. Part I.

Urban wildlife Part I: The East Kootenay birds of summer
A black bear similar to this one charged at a Summerland woman bike riding on Conkle Mountain in Summerland (September 2020.) (Black Press file photo)
A black bear similar to this one charged at a Summerland woman bike riding on Conkle Mountain in Summerland (September 2020.) (Black Press file photo)
What you see …

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it large or actual-sized to editor@trailtimes.ca

What you see …
People’s Choice winner: Eileen Harris of Kelowna, bumble bee clinging to grass.

PHOTOS: BC SPCA announces winners in 12th annual wildlife photo contest

From stoats to skunks, bears to bees, amateur photographers capture province at its wildest

People’s Choice winner: Eileen Harris of Kelowna, bumble bee clinging to grass.
Conservation groups blast province for logging in caribou habitat near Revelstoke

Conservation groups blast province for logging in caribou habitat near Revelstoke

In the last year, 104 cuts have been approved near Revelstoke in caribou habitat

Conservation groups blast province for logging in caribou habitat near Revelstoke
The Pacific Rim National Park Reserve installed three new tunnels under the highway between Tofino and Ucluelet to help prevent roadkill incidents and connect important amphibians and other wildlife to their wetland and forest habitats. (Barb Beasley photo)

Frog tunnels installed near Tofino to keep amphibians safe while hopping under highway

Three new tunnels installed in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

The Pacific Rim National Park Reserve installed three new tunnels under the highway between Tofino and Ucluelet to help prevent roadkill incidents and connect important amphibians and other wildlife to their wetland and forest habitats. (Barb Beasley photo)
Conservation officer Kyle Bueckert said the cougar could have come to Grand Forks from nearby Observation Mountain

B.C. cougar kills fawn next to home of Kootenay wildlife official

The official says the cat hasn’t returned to the site of its kill in Grand Forks, B.C.

Conservation officer Kyle Bueckert said the cougar could have come to Grand Forks from nearby Observation Mountain
Man charged after cougar harassed with a slingshot in Banff National Park

Man charged after cougar harassed with a slingshot in Banff National Park

Charges were laid against a Saskatchewan man for disturbing wildlife in a national park

Man charged after cougar harassed with a slingshot in Banff National Park
Dead porcupine hung from road sign in North Okanagan

Dead porcupine hung from road sign in North Okanagan

Porcupines are fully protected under the B.C. Wildlife Act

Dead porcupine hung from road sign in North Okanagan