B.C. couple goes on ‘chicken wrangling mission’ to give Lucky a new home

Lucky (front) and Olive in their chicken run. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Lucky (front) and Olive in their chicken run. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Lucky strolls through her chicken run in the winter sun. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Lucky strolls through her chicken run in the winter sun. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Susan Caldbeck trying to entice her chickens out into the open. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Susan Caldbeck trying to entice her chickens out into the open. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Susan Caldbeck holding her chicken Olive. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Susan Caldbeck holding her chicken Olive. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Olive (front) and Lucky spending some time in their coop. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Olive (front) and Lucky spending some time in their coop. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Susan Caldbeck with her donkeys on her Agassiz farm. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Susan Caldbeck with her donkeys on her Agassiz farm. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
Pink Cadillac checking to see if the photographer is willing to give out some scratches. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)Pink Cadillac checking to see if the photographer is willing to give out some scratches. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)
B.C. couple goes on ‘chicken wrangling mission’ to give Lucky a new home

Susan Caldbeck stood at the edge of the chicken wire fence on her Agassiz farm, a bucket of blueberries and seed in hand. Around her were a number of donkeys — rescue donkeys, prize-winning donkeys and one donkey with scoliosis in her back — but Caldbeck didn’t pay attention to them. She only had eyes for the chickens.

“Olive. Lucky. Girlies,” she said, calling out to the two chickens in a high pitched voice reserved for pets and small children. “Where’s my chickens?”

The long, low bawck of an unimpressed chicken rose from the coop. Then, the white and red head of a Leghorn peered out.

“Oh hello Lucky,” Caldbeck said, smiling. She tossed some seeds into the run, and Lucky pecked them up, then looked around as if to ask ‘Where’s my blueberries?’

It seemed a pleasant life for a chicken, but it hadn’t been long ago that Lucky was not quite so lucky.

In early January, 55-year-old Caldbeck was looking through Facebook when she saw a post from woman who had found a chicken underneath her trailer.

RELATED: What makes chickens happy? University of Guelph researchers try to find out

“It was the rainstorm right before the snowstorm,” Caldbeck remembered. Normally, she said, she would have passed the post by.

“But then she’s like, ‘Some cat’s going to get this chicken,’” she said. “I’m like, really? That’s the end of it?”

Comments on the Facebook post about putting the chicken in a pot also pushed her to do something.

“This poor chicken has survived some pretty traumatic stuff already,” Caldbeck said. “She deserves a chance to live.”

“So my poor husband got home 20 minutes later, and I’m like, ‘Come on, let’s go, we’re going on a chicken wrangling mission.’”

YLucky (front) in her coop with fellow chicken Olive. (Grace Kennedy/The Observer)

The pair went over with a fishnet, and eventually cornered the rain-soaked chicken, scooped her up and took her home.

“She was so skinny,” Caldbeck said. “I have no idea where she came from.

“Somebody said maybe she’s a spent chicken,” she added, “so she’s finished laying her eggs and she’s going to get slaughtered.”

That didn’t deter Caldbeck though. Nor did the fact that, although she and her husband had been nominated farmers of the year when they lived in Aldergrove for their donkey breeding, she had never owned chickens before.

SEE ALSO: Old ‘Harrison Hot Springs Hotel’ panel truck returns to area

“I have no clue what to do with a chicken,” she said, laughing. “Give me a donkey, a horse, you know.”

Caldbeck put Lucky up in a dog kennel they converted into a chicken coop and set about creating a home for the chicken.

Her husband, called “Poor Dave” by Caldbeck’s friends, built and rebuilt a roost for Lucky 12 times. Calbeck went out and bought 88 pounds of food, because she wasn’t sure which kind of chicken feed Lucky liked best. And of course, they went out and got a friend for Lucky as well.

Olive, a deep brown chicken with flecks of black and white on her feathers, came to live with Caldbeck shortly after Lucky arrived.

With Olive’s companionship and Caldbeck’s love, Lucky prospered. Thanks to Caldbeck’s posts in the Life in Agassiz Facebook group, she became a local internet celebrity. And along the way, she found that she wasn’t a spent chicken after all.

Since Valentine’s Day, Caldbeck has gotten more than a dozen eggs from the two chickens.

“I actually told them they didn’t have to lay eggs,” Caldbeck said, laughing. “The thought of giving birth every day just seems like a really bad idea to me.”

Caldbeck hasn’t eaten any of the eggs yet — “it’s kind of weird,” she said — but has plans to increase her flock to get eggs of all different colours.

“They have to be fancy chickens if they’re going to live here. Other than Lucky,” Caldbeck added. “She’s just a boring old Leghorn, but that’s okay.”



grace.kennedy@ahobserver.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

crowe shop
Shop class receives wonderful response from West Kootenay residents

“Each item came with its own little story which was really neat to hear.” - Dale Smyth

(File photo)
Rossland council surveys residents for input on new city plan

Rosslands Official Community Plan has run its course, and the city is nudging residents for input

Amanda Parsons, a registered nurse on staff at the Northwood Care facility, administers a dose of the Moderna vaccine to Ann Hicks, 77, in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan-Pool
61 new COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Interior Health

Twenty-nine people are in hospital, seven of whom are in intensive care

View of the city from West Trail. Photo: Ryden Wahl
What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it large or actual-size to editor@trailtimes.ca

Summer does provide some shelter for homeless. In winter, it’s a different story. Photo: Jim Bailey
Trail RCMP offer healing approach to mental health and addictions

People living with a mental illness and substance use disorders need assistance not incarceration

Syringe is prepared with one of B.C.’s first vials of Pfizer vaccine to prevent COVID-19, Victoria, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 caseload stays steady with 465 more Tuesday

No new outbreaks in health care facilities, 12 more deaths

Inspection of bridge crossing on a B.C. forest service road. (B.C. Forest Practices Board)
B.C. falling behind in maintenance of forest service roads

Auditor finds nearly half of bridges overdue for repair

(Black Press Media files)
Woman steals bottles of wine after brandishing stun baton in New Westminster

Police say the female suspect was wearing a beige trench coat with fur lining

Stand up paddleboarder Christie Jamieson is humbled to her knees as a pod of transient orcas put on a dramatic show on Jan. 19 in the Ucluelet Harbour. (Nora O’Malley photo)
UPDATED WITH VIDEO: Vancouver Island paddle boarder surrounded by pod of orcas

“My whole body is still shaking. I don’t even know what to do with this energy.”

Toronto’s Mass Vaccination Clinic is shown on Sunday January 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Canadian malls, conference centres, hotels offer up space for COVID vaccination centres

Commercial real estate association REALPAC said that a similar initiative was seeing success in the U.K.

Kamala Harris and Joe Biden are sworn into office on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)
Joe Biden has been sworn in as the 46th president of the United States

About 25,000 National Guard members have been dispatched to Washington

A memorial for the fatal bus crash involving the Humboldt Broncos hockey team at the intersection of Highways 35 and 335 near Tisdale, Tuesday, October 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards
‘End of the road:’ Truck driver in Humboldt Broncos crash awaits deportation decision

Sidhu was sentenced almost two years ago to eight years after pleading guilty to dangerous driving

Cumberland photographer Sara Kemper recently took the top spot in a Canadian Geographic photography contest. Photo by Sara Kemper
B.C. photographer takes top Canadian Geographic photo prize

Sara Kemper shows what home means to her in Comox Valley photo

Most Read