This White Rock home would run you $1.3 million, the benchmark price for a home in the city. (Zoocasa)

This White Rock home would run you $1.3 million, the benchmark price for a home in the city. (Zoocasa)

It could take you 218 years to save up for a house in this B.C. neighbourhood

It would take 27 years in the most affordable city in the Lower Mainland

Are you saving up for a house? Well, better prepare yourself because you could be on a budget for more than 200 years.

That not-so-great news comes from real estate firm Zoocasa, which looked at how long a median-income household would take to save up for a new home if they saved 20 per cent of their salary.

The median income for homes in Vancouver’s West End neighbourhood is $65,327, the firm says, so it would take 218 years to afford a whopping $2.9-million benchmark price detached home.

West Vancouver was the second least affordable area, with a median household income of $89,808 and a timespan of 134 years before one could afford to a $2.5-million detached home.

READ MORE: The priciest home for sale in Canada is a $38M Vancouver penthouse

On the other end of the scale, a Maple Ridge household with a median income of $86,178 would only need to wait 27 years before they could afford a $804,200 detached home, based on the benchmark price.

In Surrey, the fastest growing city in the Lower Mainland, a median household income of $77,494 and benchmark detached home price of $979,767 would leave a family waiting 46 years.

In the more affluent, but also much more expensive South Surrey and White Rock area, a $80,430 median income would entail saving up for 67 years before being able to buy a $1.3 million home.

This is how long it will take you to save up for a detached home in these Lower Mainland cities. (Zoocasa)


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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