Trail hiker shares majestic view of the Purcells in autumn

A view of the mountain range through larches on Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda HaleyA view of the mountain range through larches on Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda Haley
View from a hike up Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda HaleyView from a hike up Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda Haley
View of the Purcell mountain range from Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda HaleyView of the Purcell mountain range from Jumbo Pass. Photo: Brenda Haley

Brenda Haley shares these breathtaking photos of a recent hike up to Jumbo Pass, in the Purcell mountains.

From the West Kootenay side, Jumbo Pass is accessed by the Glacier Creek FSR (forest service road) in the Central Kootenay Regional District, around 1.5 hours from Kaslo.

According to WestKootenayHiking.ca, the downside to this hike is that the vast majority is its steady climb through the forest without much scenery along the way. Glimpses of Horseshoe Glacier is said to be visible through the trees, but it’s mostly an uphill march.

After about four kilometres, over 700 metres of elevation, and around two hours, the forest starts breaking up into patches of meadow and trees.

Scenery starts to open up up at the top of Jumbo Pass.

Purcell Wilderness Conservancy Provincial Park

The Purcell Wilderness Conservancy Park embraces six large drainages flowing east to the Columbia River system and three flowing west to Kootenay Lake. All of which emanate from the rugged and glaciated backbone of the spectacular Purcell Mountain Range of southeastern B.C.

It is a challenging, undeveloped nearly pristine mountain landscape encompassing five biogeoclimatic zones and the only intact ecosystem in southeastern B.C.

Visitors to the Purcells should be experienced, self-sufficient wilderness travellers capable of interpreting topographical maps and route-finding. Wilderness recreation values include hunting, fishing, hiking, cultural sites, climbing, horseback riding (on the east side of the park only) and wildlife viewing. A special feature also in the park is the Dewar Creek Hot Springs.

The conservancy is a non-mechanized area. This means that the use of vehicles, ATVs, snowmobiles, bicycles and helicopters to access the park are prohibited.

A number of guide-outfitters offer hunting, hiking and wildlife viewing multi-day excursions.

Note: The Fry Creek trail and Fry Creek Canyon routes are closed due to damages from a recent wildfire.

HikingKootenaysOutdoorsOutdoors and Recreation