(Brenda Haley photo)

(Brenda Haley photo)

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it (large) to editor@trailtimes.ca

Brenda Haley’s hiking took her to the Birchbank overlook on Sunday.

Her view from above highlighted the tapestry of colourful trees in their fall transition. If you have a recent photo you would like to share with our readers email it to editor@trailtimes.ca.

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Autumn leaf color is a phenomenon that affects the normal green leaves of many deciduous trees and shrubs by which they take on, during a few weeks in the autumn season, various shades of red, yellow, purple, black, blue, orange, magenta, and brown.

In some areas of Canada and the United States, “leaf peeping” tourism is a major contribution to economic activity. This tourist activity occurs between the beginning of color changes and the onset of leaf fall, usually around September and October in the Northern Hemisphere and April to May in the Southern Hemisphere.

As the Earth makes its 365-day journey around the sun, some parts of the planet will get fewer hours of sunlight at certain times of the year.

Trees respond to the decreasing amount of sunlight by producing less and less chlorophyll. Eventually, a tree stops producing chlorophyll. When that happens, the carotenoid already in the leaves can finally show through. The leaves become a bright rainbow of glowing yellows, sparkling oranges and warm browns.

~ Sourced from wiki and eekwi