.

Moms go virtual for healthy babies

For the first time in B.C., expectant mothers can participate in virtual visits with their maternity care provider

For the first time in B.C., expectant mothers can participate in virtual visits with their maternity care provider directly from their local family doctor’s office, thanks to new tele-maternity (video conferencing) technology developed as a part of a Shared Care/Kootenay Boundary Division of Family Practice pilot project. The project is funded in partnership by Doctors of BC and the Ministry of Health.

The lead physician for the program in Grand Forks is Dr. Nathan Dalla Lana. He was asked to take the physician lead by project manager Mona Mattei, who is program coordinator with Kootenay Boundary Division of Family Practice.

“I’ve been trying to set up basically a pilot project through our clinic with both Trail and Nelson although it’s been mostly Nelson so far,” he said. “I’ve spearheaded the development of the video-conferencing and then the trialing of it.”

He said the program is focused on pregnant women in the community and how to reduce travel times.

“Especially for young moms who might have other young children—driving two hours there and two hours back to Nelson for a 15 minute appointment—we want to avoid that.”

Dalla Lana said the program is also a great way to have better communication with the doctors here, who do a lot of the pre-natal care, and either the midwife or the delivery doctor in Nelson.

Dalla Lana said the feedback from the moms in the program has been very positive.

“The moms have been quite happy with it in terms of preventing travel time,” he said. “(It’s been good about) communicating and helping avoid problems through travel over there once they travel over there and go into labour.”

Jamie Colby, a young mom from Grand Forks, was able to use tele-maternity in December to connect with her midwife. Reflecting on her new option for maternity care, Colby said, “It was awesome. The visit was stress free, the connection was good and my doctor and midwife also seemed to really enjoy it.”

Colby, a 24 year-old first time mom, had her baby delivered in Nelson four weeks ago. Before learning about tele-maternity she was traveling two hours from Grand Forks to Nelson to meet with her midwife about once per month for pre-natal appointments.

“I didn’t know they had the tele-conferencing available,” she said. “I was going to Nelson where they brought it up with me. I phoned my doctor here (Sebastian) and we set it up.”

Colby said the biggest benefit was not having to drive the Paulsen Summit in the winter.

“I think it’s convenient,” she said. “Saving money and saving time was the big factor. You spend four hours traveling time for a 15 minute appointment. It was just like having a regular doctor’s visit with them.”

 

Colby said she would get a physical check up from Dr. Sebastian and he would relay any message to the midwife. “I would then talk about any questions with the midwife,” she said. “I was able to talk about my birth plan. It was like she was in the room. It was really pleasant and easygoing.”

 

 

Just Posted

Trail liquor store held up Friday night

The perpetrator was brandishing a weapon that appeared to be a gun, according to the Trail RCMP

Trail Smoke Eaters lose in shootout to Coquitlam Express

The Trail Smoke Eaters battled the Express in a tight checking 2-1 shootout loss on Friday

Lest We Forget

Crowd fills downtown Trail for Remembrance Day ceremony

Remembering Trail veterans

The Trail Legion now has 14 veterans from the Second World War

3 games, 3 wins for the Vees

Penticton wins 4-3 over Smoke Eaters

VIDEO: Marvel Comics’ Stan Lee dies

Marvel co-creator was well-known for making cameo appearances in superhero movies

Feds dropped ball with WWI anniversary tributes: historians

Wrote one historian: ‘Other than the Vimy Ridge celebration … I think they have done a very bad job’

Sides ‘far apart’ in Canada Post talks despite mediation, says union

The lack of a breakthrough means rotating strikes will resume Tuesday

Feds’ appeal of solitary confinement decision in B.C. to be heard

Judge ruled in January that indefinite such confinement is unconstitutional, causes permanent harm

B.C. health care payroll tax approved, takes effect Jan. 1

Employers calculating cost, including property taxes increases

Nunavut urges new plan to deal with too many polar bears

Territory recommends a proposal that contradicts much of conventional scientific thinking

Shelter struggles: Landlord takes over rental unit whenever visiting B.C. town

Renter’s story highlights how hard it is to find accommodation in Revelstoke

Lack of public response threatens B.C. referendum credibility

Of the few who have voted, poll finds most rejected proportional representation

Tentative deal reached in NHL concussion lawsuit

More than 100 former players accused the league of failing to better prevent head trauma

Most Read