Student whose throat was slashed in UBC dormitory alleges negligence in lawsuit

Mary Hare was in her room in 2016 when Thamer Almestadi entered carrying a knife, civil lawsuit says

A young woman whose throat was slashed inside a University of British Columbia student residence has filed a lawsuit against the school alleging negligence.

The notice of civil claim says Mary Hare was inside her room in Salish House in October 2016 when international student Thamer Almestadi entered carrying a knife.

Almestadi’s trial heard he knocked on the 19-year-old’s door, slit her throat and started choking her before other students pulled him off.

A court found the teen not criminally responsible because he was suffering from a psychotic episode in which he believed the Qur’an had sent him a message to kill Hare.

Hare alleges in the lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court that UBC failed to install or properly install a peephole or any chains, bars or latches that would allow a door to be opened safely while remaining locked and preventing unwanted entry of potential assailants.

None of the allegations has been proven in court and the university has not yet filed a statement of defence.

The lawsuit says UBC should have been aware of the risks of forced entry and assaults in dormitory rooms.

“The assault occurred due to the negligence of UBC,” it says.

The university failed “to take any, or any reasonable, care for the plaintiff’s safety while knowing, or having ought to have known that she was at risk of imminent danger, violence and/or threat,” it adds.

The documents say Hare suffered lacerations and abrasions on her throat, a cut to her shoulder, injuries to her trachea and larynx and still has scars from the attack.

She also continues to suffer depression, anxiety, emotional upset and post-traumatic stress disorder, the lawsuit says.

She is seeking damages for her pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life, medical expenses and past and future wage loss. No specific dollar amount is provided.

The B.C. Review Board discharged Almestadi from a psychiatric hospital earlier this year in order for him to return to his home country of Saudi Arabia, where his parents had designed a treatment plan.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Tearing down old Trail

Asbestos removal on the Union Hotel and nearby property continue in downtown Trail

March of the umps

Umpires for the 2018 BC Little League Championship in Trail made their way to the field

Trail boat launch closed

Trees are being felled in preparation for the skate park ground-breaking on Monday

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email editor@trailtimes.ca

Let’s play ball; Trail ready for B.C. Little League championship

Click story to see the games schedule for the 2018 Little League BC Major Provincial Championships

Here’s what you need to know about Day 2 at the BC Games

From equestrian to volleyball to swimming, all 18 events in full swing here in the Cowichan Valley

Race walker breaks 18-year-old BC Games record

Zone 6 athlete Olivia Lundman crossed finish line with ease, to loud cheers in Cowichan

PHOTO GALLERY: BC Games Day 2

A brief look at action from the 2018 BC Summer Games in the Cowichan Valley

BC Wildfire update on 14 major Okanagan blazes

Watch the media briefing on the current fire situation in the Okanagan.

2017 wildfires give B.C. mom chance to say thank you to officer who saved her son

An unlikely encounter in the rural community of Likely, near Williams Lake

UPDATED: Kinder Morgan pipeline protesters defy eviction order

Demonstrators at Camp Cloud in Burnaby say they won’t leave, but will meet with city officials

B.C. tent city camper arrested for taking coins from fountain

The man, who built a shelter at a Saanich park, says homeless people are unfairly targeted

Ex-Raptor DeMar DeRozan says goodbye to Toronto on Instagram

The guard was traded to the San Antonio Spurs earlier this week for Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green

Okanagan wildfires have potential to become firestorms, says UBC expert

David Andison said to let smaller fires go, to create pockets in the landscape for new forests

Most Read