Halloween is what we believe it to be

McEwan writes, “Every year the emphasis on creepy, sinister things seems to gain in popularity.”

Is there any harm in participating in the annual celebration of Halloween? Some think so.

I first encountered the opinion that Halloween may be spiritually dangerous when my children were young. I was surprised when a friend announced that her children would not be dressing up and trick-or-treating. She objected to the pagan roots of the celebration with their emphasis on evil spirits and death.

I don’t know if my friend was ahead of the curve with her objection to Halloween because at the time not many shared her concerns. But, there is a lively debate in some Christian circles about the appropriateness of allowing children to participate in this cultural event.

On view holds that Christians who participate in Halloween open themselves and their children to evil. There is a literal belief that evil spirits roaming the earth on Halloween might catch hold of an unwary soul. A more moderate view holds that Halloween is contradictory to the Christian message; Halloween celebrates the “lord of death”, while Christianity proclaims a God of life.

While I don’t share these particular concerns, the darker side of Halloween has captured the cultural imagination. Every year the emphasis on creepy, sinister things seems to gain in popularity.

Halloween is not a religious celebration in our society. Its pagan aspects only become an issue if one gives them credence. The fear of spirits roaming the night for the purpose of creating havoc and harm pales in comparison to the darker and more wicked aspects of human existence that are reported daily in the news. There are more pressing and immediate concerns in the world with which to be concerned.

If I object to anything about today’s celebration of Halloween, it is the commercialism that has taken hold. Halloween is big bucks, second only to Christmas in consumer spending. In 2015, Canadians spent one billion dollars on Halloween related purchases. Waste goes along with all of this spending on costumes, candy and decorations.

The Halloween of my youth was more of a homegrown event. Neighbours doled out candied apples, sticky popcorn balls, caramels or special baking, all of which they made themselves. Costumes, too, were mostly handmade, fashioned from items that were at hand.

None of these changes dampen my enthusiasm for the celebration. Opening the door to the neighbourhood kids decked out in their costumes rekindles the child in me. Their infectious excitement recalls that of my own when I once traipsed around the neighbourhood in costume collecting treats on a dark and spooky night.

Participating in Halloween is an important part of maturing for many children. Dressing up nurtures the imagination and is akin to walking a mile in someone else’s shoes. Masquerading aids the development of empathy. The spooky parts of Halloween help master fear. It takes courage to walk up to a house cloaked in darkness and playing eerie music. And, the feeling of independence when one can finally go trick-or-treating with friends, not parents, is exhilarating.

There is nothing inherently evil about the celebration of Halloween in our time. It becomes what we believe it to be – a night of darkness, or simple, good, clean fun with a developmental purpose.

Trail BC resident Louise McEwan is a freelance writer with degrees in English and Theology. Contact her at mcewan. lou@gmail.com

Just Posted

Threatened species found nesting at Teck Trail

Canadian data collected from 1968 to 2005 show an 80 per cent decline of the Common Nighthawk

Pitching proportional representation

Advocates say about half of population is aware of referendum

Genesis of a Trail mural

Toews is planning to begin painting the mural next week

RAM Camp opens next week, all musicians welcome

You don’t have to be accomplished to go to the two-day camp, organizers say

Lost sheep returned to the fold — stolen sculpture reappears

The Castlegar Sculpturewalk sculpture was reported missing Tuesday.

VIDEO: Messages of hope, encouragement line bars of B.C. bridge

WARNING: This story contains references to suicide and may not be appropriate for all audiences.

Fresh-faced Flames fend off Canucks 4-1

Vancouver drops second straight NHL exhibition contest

VIDEO: B.C. deer struggles with life-preserver caught in antlers

Campbell River resident captures entangled deer on camera

Scheer pushes Trudeau to re-start Energy East pipeline talks

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer questioned the Prime Minister over Trans Mountain project

Mistaken identity: Missing dog claimed in Moose Jaw belongs to another family

Brennen Duncan was reunited with a white Kuvasz that was found in Saskatchewan

Abandoned kitten safe and sound thanks to B.C. homeless man

‘Jay’ found little black-and-white kitten in a carrier next to a dumpster by a Chilliwack pet store

Police chief defends controversial marijuana seizure

Advocates said cannabis was part of an opioid-substitution program in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Trans Mountain completes Burrard Inlet spill exercise

Training required, some work continues on pipeline expansion

Supporters of B.C. man accused of murdering Belgian tourist pack courtoom

Family and friends of Sean McKenzie, 27, filled the gallery for brief court appearance in Chilliwack

Most Read