Terry Moon stands beside a plethora of instruments – from clarinets to drums and saxophones to guitars – in awe of what has been donated to the band program.

Terry Moon stands beside a plethora of instruments – from clarinets to drums and saxophones to guitars – in awe of what has been donated to the band program.

Band program marches on

The Trail Alliance Church is making some beautiful noise.



The Trail Alliance Church is making some beautiful noise.

A band program proposed by the church for low-income students—but open to students from each soci-economic plane—is slated to get a boost by forging a partnership with School District 20 (SD20).

Terry Moon, the facilities administrator at the Alliance Church, was ecstatic about the positive response and cooperation he received at the SD20 board of trustees meeting in Blueberry Creek last month.

“I can’t ask for anymore right now,” Moon said after the meeting.

“I’m just plain excited about where we could go with this (program).”

He added that support from the community and the school district’s principals has been overwhelming, anticipating the district would begin the process of setting up extra-curricular activities within the next week.

The proposed program is expected to run twice a week after school with additional social events like a coffee house to get kids chatting. There will be a starter band for anybody who has never played an instrument before, and an intermediate band for those who already have the fundamentals.

The Maple Leaf Band, SwingSations and a former J. L. Crowe music teacher have volunteered to aid the needs of the student band program this fall with some mentoring and instruction.

“The only thing the schools can do for us directly is just to let the students know the program is available,” he said.

“From there, we have to work with the school board to get the instruments we know are sitting and put them to work and not collect dust. And let our students grow.”

His goal was to get youth off the street and give them something they can feel really good about by build up a program that will boost their confidence, he said.

“We could put the darn program back in the schools and that is the exciting part,” he added. “But the kids will go away with something they will never forget in their lives.”

Moon is working closely with the church to secure the correct permits to open up a coffee shop element, in an attempt to offer “street kids” somewhere safe to go.

But the church needs instruments to make its dream come true. Moon said they are still looking for anyone with instruments around their house that they are no longer using and could consider donating to the program.

The former Kingdom Hall on Laburnum Drive—renamed, the AMP (the Alliance Meeting Place)—will be the site of the band program.

If you can help with the program or would like more information, contact Moon at 250-368-9516.