Six groups of Beaver Scouts (ages 5-7) took part in an overnight Beaveree at Camp Tweedsmuir on the weekend. The Beaver Scouts from Beaver Valley and Warfield hosted the event and welcomed scouts from Nelson, Creston, Rossland and Oliver. In total there were 80 campers, including 42 Beavers, 30 adults and eight scout helpers who attended to earn their volunteer hours for the Chief Scout Award.

Six groups of Beaver Scouts (ages 5-7) took part in an overnight Beaveree at Camp Tweedsmuir on the weekend. The Beaver Scouts from Beaver Valley and Warfield hosted the event and welcomed scouts from Nelson, Creston, Rossland and Oliver. In total there were 80 campers, including 42 Beavers, 30 adults and eight scout helpers who attended to earn their volunteer hours for the Chief Scout Award.

Beaveree overnighter at Camp Tweedsmuir

Six groups of the youngest Beaver Scouts spent a night at Camp Tweedsmuir on the weekend

The Beaver Valley and Warfield Beaver Scouts (ages five to seven) hosted an overnight Beaveree at Camp Tweedsmuir on the weekend.

“In the past it has been a day camp,” says Erin Robson from 1st Beaver Valley Beavers. “However, this year we put a spin on it and made it an overnight camp.”

Other towns and cities across the country have started doing this with great success, and Robson took the idea from a similar event in Sylvan Lake.

Seven themed stations were set up, including knight training, tug of war, scroll printing, shield making, helmet making, boffering (a sword or spear made from light weight material and padded with foam to prevent injury), as well as bow and arrow shooting.

“During the camp we had a theme, which was a medieval this year, and we had the kids go around and do stations,” she explained.

“They learned how to write on homemade paper, shoot bows, made an historically accurate shield and helmet, learned the art of boffering, and practiced their skills at obstacle courses along with the main one of learning how to camp. For many of them, this is their first time away from home without their parents.”

At night, the group had a large campfire and sing-a-long.

“The kids slept in the cabins at the camp and were mixed up so none of the kids know each other in their groups,” Robson added. “Typically, this is a great way for them to meet new kids with similar interests from other towns.”