Everyday Theology: The Gospel is political

"Trump must have forgotten that the Vatican doesn’t need a savior; it already has one."

The international media was recently abuzz with “a feud” between Pope Francis and Donald Trump. Of the media’s making, the attention grabbing headlines made for some entertainment while at the same time shining a spotlight on Christianity and politics in the United States.

On board the papal plane flying home from his trip to Mexico, reporters asked Francis about Trump’s plans to deport illegal immigrants and build a wall along the American-Mexican border. Francis’ reply drew the ire of Trump and his supporters; “A person who thinks only about building walls – wherever they may be – and not building bridges, is not Christian. This is not the Gospel.” Francis went onto give Trump the benefit of the doubt.

Trump fired back describing himself as a “good Christian”, and calling the Pope’s comments “disgraceful.” He carried on, rather like a petulant child threatening retribution after his parents have scolded him. When ISIS attacks the Vatican, the Pope will be sorry; the Pope will wish he had listened to Donald Trump and prayed for him to become President. Trump must have forgotten that the Vatican doesn’t need a savior; it already has one.

Unlike in Canada, religion continues to play a significant role in American elections. Trump and other presidential hopefuls are courting the religious vote. To win the Pope’s endorsement would be a coup d’état. Unfortunately for the candidates, Francis has no intention of telling American Catholics how to mark their ballots. However, he has no problem talking about socio-political issues that affect the common good and do harm.

This annoys the Trump camp for which walls are more desirable than bridges. It wants a Christianity that advances protectionism and makes no demands. It is much less keen on a Gospel that “comforts the afflicted and afflicts the comfortable.”

While the Pope’s comment about what it means to be a Christian clearly hit a nerve, it was not surprising. Francis has never been easy on Christians, particularly clerics, who pay lip service to the Gospel but fail to walk the talk. And his comment on building walls instead of bridges is in keeping with his consistent and unequivocal support for migrants and refugees.

The Pope is not making up stuff about being Christian to irritate the Trump camp. Francis is reminding all of us that building walls, “wherever they may be”, reinforces unjust economic and social structures. These things imprison millions of people around the globe. Building bridges, on the other hand, helps individuals live with dignity.

While some in the Trump camp want the Pope to shut up and butt out, there is an inherently political element to the Gospel. Despite the confident assertion of evangelical Jerry Falwell Jr. (a Trump supporter) that “Jesus never intended to give instruction to political leaders on how to run a country”, the Gospel does challenge the attitudes and policies of “good Christian” leaders.

Religion is not a tool for garnering votes to secure personal power. Nor is faith a matter of convenience, but of discipleship. Sometimes, the demands of discipleship are just plain irritating.

Trail BC resident Louise McEwan is a freelance writer with degrees in English and Theology. Her blog is www.faithcolouredglasses.blogspot.com. Contact her at mcewan.lou@gmail.com

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