J. Lloyd Crowe’s Amy Gourlie (left) and Jen Marrandino are among nearly 30 students participating in today’s Vow of Silence. Raising awareness for Children’s Rights. The students will give up all forms of communication for 24 hours.

J. Lloyd Crowe’s Amy Gourlie (left) and Jen Marrandino are among nearly 30 students participating in today’s Vow of Silence. Raising awareness for Children’s Rights. The students will give up all forms of communication for 24 hours.

JL Crowe students go silent for children’s rights

Annual Vow of Silence highlights plight of children worldwide who are frequently denied their rights.

J. Lloyd Crowe’s bustling atmosphere is silent today for a charitable and enlightening cause.

Nearly 30 students are participating in the annual Vow of Silence.

The students are raising awareness for children worldwide who are frequently denied their rights as well as their voice.

“I want youth to know what is actually happening around the world” said Jennifer Marrandino, Grade 11 student.

Coupled with refusing to speak, Crowe students also collected donations and are disconnecting from their cell phones and computers for 24 hours.

When previously asked what the hardest thing to live without would be; students repeatedly agreed that not being able to communicate verbally would be the hardest.

“All of a sudden there is a barrier between me and my friends” said Amy Gourlie, Grade 11 student. “But I want a taste of how these (silenced) children feel,” she added.

J. Lloyd Crowe’s entire donation will go to the Vow of Silence Fund and effectively benefit many impoverished children on a global level.

Canadian Craig Kielburger established the Vow of Silence 16 years ago as part of his non-profit organization, Free the Children.

Initially, Craig’s organization spread nationwide, but has since spanned internationally to 46 other participating countries.

Last year 102,493 youth took part in the Vow of Silence raising money and educating others on children around the world and their lack to basic human rights.

Crowe students agreed that things such as playing, laughing, and going to school are often taken for granted in Canada. Yet sadly, two hundred million children around the world are still forced to work as child  labourers.

This reality brings thousands of youth together every year.

For more information on this organization or to make a personal donation visit www.freethechildren.com/vowofsilence.

Danielle Clarke is a J.L. Crowe student participating in the Work Experience Program.