November served up cool and dry weather conditions

After the first snowfall warning in the West Kootenay was issued Nov. 7, the rest of the month saw mainly clear skies and cold temperatures

After the first snowfall warning in the West Kootenay was issued Nov. 7, the rest of the month saw mainly clear skies, cold temperatures and unusually dry ground.

The first snow of the season fell on the morning of Nov. 4, measuring a minimal 0.2 centimetres, followed by a snowstorm three days later that brought an initial accumulation of wet snow which rapidly melted, said Ron Lakeman, weather forecaster for the Southeast Fire Centre.

Another storm cycle typical for the month brought a mix of rain and snow from Nov. 15 to Nov. 19, rounding out the month’s total precipitation to 91 per cent of normal, measuring 84.6 millimetres compared to the usual 92.9 mm.

And as the holiday season inches closer, a blast of Arctic air will bring in colder days, with highs of -5 C and overnight lows of -10 C, according to Chris Cowan, forecaster at the Centre.

“Wind is constantly blowing out of the north,” said Cowan. “This is called the Arctic pipeline meaning the air comes down on us right from the North Pole.”

He said the last time there was an Arctic outbreak was in 2008, which at the time buried B.C., particularly the Coast, in more snow than usual.

Red Mountain Resort is on course to open on Dec. 14, with a snow report showing an 8 cm snowfall Monday night, adding to a total snowfall of 131.5 cm since Nov. 1, and a current alpine snow depth of 92 cm.