Interested citizens can track the progress of the pipe-pedestrian bridge online through the City of Trail’s website. A camera is designed to take a photo every 30 minutes and provide a time-lapse for viewers. Visit the “Live Cam” on the city’s homepage.

Interested citizens can track the progress of the pipe-pedestrian bridge online through the City of Trail’s website. A camera is designed to take a photo every 30 minutes and provide a time-lapse for viewers. Visit the “Live Cam” on the city’s homepage.

Time-lapse camera tracks bridge build

Interested residents can watch the new bridge being built with a time-lapse camera taking progress snaps every 30 minutes.

Residents with a keen interest in the new pipeline/pedestrian bridge can watch the build from the comfort of their home since the city’s time-lapse camera is now live.

The camera snaps a picture every 30 minutes, collecting images of the construction until its completion in December of this year.

The super-wide angle lens, set up about 800 feet downstream from the site, captures the project from afar, but the picture is magnified with a zoom-in tool located on the top left corner of the page.

There are several ways to access the camera. From a desktop, there is a direct link “Live Cam” from the city’s homepage to the camera site. Or, from a mobile device, access www.trail.ca and type “time lapse” in the “Search for” for field. The link is also posted on the city’s Facebook page and Twitter feed.

Andrea Jolly, Trail’s communications and events coordinator, said documenting and sharing a build of this magnitude was fitting since the support of the community and the region was instrumental in bringing the project to reality.

“The live camera is an opportunity for anyone to view the project,” she said. “It also creates a sense of excitement as construction progresses.

“When we shared the camera link on Facebook, we received thousands of views and many shares,” she added. “We can see there is a lot of interest in the project.”

The images will be archived for the city’s record but also as a means of later compiling a time-lapse video that will show the construction from beginning to end in just a few short minutes.

Once completed, the video will be posted to the city’s YouTube page for viewing pleasure for years to come.

“Time-lapse videos for large construction projects are quite fascinating, and we’d like this video to be part of our opening ceremony of the bridge,” explained Jolly.

“We are still working through a few glitches, so we ask for everyone’s patience,” she added.