Nick Gilder and Sweeney Todd took the stage on Thursday evening. (Wayne Mallette/Grand Forks Gazette)

Nick Gilder and Sweeney Todd took the stage on Thursday evening. (Wayne Mallette/Grand Forks Gazette)

CannaFest 2017 takes the stage

Over 8000 people turned up for the three-day event

After a packed weekend, CannaFest 2017 is over and done, but not without a lasting impact on the community.

Over 8,000 people turned out for the three days of entertainment, which ran Thursday through Saturday. This year’s headliners included Credence Clearwater Revisited, Randy Bachman, Loverboy, Trooper and Saga.

In addition to entertainment throughout the afternoons and evenings, this year also featured Marijuana Mornings educational seminars, as well as pancake breakfasts by the Elks on Friday and Saturday mornings. Camping for the weekend, as well as motels in town, were sold-out for the weekend.

Guests come from throughout B.C. and Washington state for the weekend; this year, unusually, a super-fan came from as far as San Diego to see Saga perform on Friday night. Lead vocalist Michael Sadler hopped off stage to shake his hand.

Randy Bachman endeared himself to fans after asking that security allow dancers closer to the stage, and afterwards signed the record of a fan who had been front and centre to the stage for his set.

CannaFest also made several charitable donations to local groups over the weekend. the Border Bruins benefited from $10,000 for the team’s new bus, while the Perley PAC received $5,000. All told, founder Chuck Varabioff said the festival raised $35,000 for charity.

 

After a packed weekend, CannaFest 2017 is over and done, but not without a lasting impact on the community.                                Crowd favourite Saga took the stage Friday night, one of many bands that evening that kept the crowd dancing.

After a packed weekend, CannaFest 2017 is over and done, but not without a lasting impact on the community. Crowd favourite Saga took the stage Friday night, one of many bands that evening that kept the crowd dancing.