North South Vulnerable

North South Vulnerable

A weak response with any five-card suit

The bidding:

South, with 13 high card points, opens one diamond, his better minor. North will bid his four-card suits up the line except when he has a five-card suit. North bids hearts, his five-card suit. South, without four-card support, bids his second suit, clubs.

The bidding:

South, with 13 high card points, opens one diamond, his better minor. North will bid his four-card suits up the line except when he has a five-card suit. North bids hearts, his five-card suit. South, without four-card support, bids his second suit, clubs.

South has been given a choice of two suits. He must pick diamonds because it is partner’s first-bid suit, which is likely longer than the second suit.

With six hearts, he could have bid two hearts, his own suit. However, with a minimum hand, six to nine points, one tries to pick one of partner’s suits.

The contract: Two diamonds by South

The opening lead: The ace of spades. The unbid suit seems like a reasonable lead.

The play: East wins the second round of spades and switches to a trump.

Declarer has a holding in hearts best played by the opponents. Clubs is about the same.

Declarer plays up to the queen of clubs, which loses to the king.

Opponent exit a trump because a spade would lead to a sluff-and-a-ruff. Declarer loses two spades, two hearts, one diamond and two clubs. He gave the opponents an opportunity to help and they chose not to.

The result: Two diamonds down two for -200

Note:  The points do not have a favourable lie for the declarer. Whether, they have or not, the declarer must try to get the opponents to play the suits for him.