Not all wildlife hibernates, so as the snow flies, Rossland/Trail WildSafeBC is reminding locals to keep up their good practices of securing garbage and managing other wildlife attractants. (Ron Wilson photo)

Keep up good practices in winter, advises Rossland/Trail WildsafeBC

WildSafeBC; Not all animals hibernate, important to manage attractants year round

Not all animals tuck in for winter.

As the snow begins to fly, Rossland/Trail WildSafeBC is reminding locals to keep up their good practices of securing garbage and managing other wildlife attractants.

”There may be some bears still out,” advises Community Coordinator Desiree Profili, noting the bruins will eventually hibernate for most of the winter as snow sets in.

But other wildlife, like cougars, foxes, coyotes, ungulates, raccoons and pack rats, may still come sniffing around because they do not hibernate at all.

“People are starting to put the WildsafeBC message into practice,” said Profili. “And communities as-a-whole are starting to change their thinking, which is awesome, with initiatives like bear proof bins in parks, communal bins in Trail, pick-and- press events and changes to bylaws.”

She notes more homeowners are getting on board with proactive measures like electric fencing and fruit gleaning.

But there is still a way to go dealing with all wildlife year round.

“I think one of the big issues is the focus on bears instead of wildlife in general,” Profili explained. “As seen right now with the coyote issue in Trail. And I do know driving with awareness is something we also need to focus on too.”

Profili was referring to the number of animals hit on Highway 3B between Rossland and Trail this year.

To date, there’s been a cow moose, two coyotes, a sow black bear and at least one deer killed on that stretch.

“Causing loss of wildlife as well as damage to property,” she added.

With December and the true Canadian winter rolling in, Profili says WildsafeBC is heading into hibernation.

“I would like to say thank you to Columbia Basin Trust, the British Columbia Conservation Foundation, the City of Trail staff and council, and the City of Rossland staff and council for all their support in the 2017 season,” she said.

“We would also like to thank all the local event organizers, clubs, news media, and local Conservation Officers, Ben Beetlestone, Blair Thin and Logan Proulx.

“Without all the community support we receive each year our program would not be able to accomplish all its goals.”

As we enter the winter months, please remember many animals do not hibernate, so let’s all continue to do our parts to “Keep Wildlife Wild and Communities Safe,” Profili concluded.

“Have a safe holiday season and we will see you in the spring when we come out of hibernation for the 2018 season.”

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