New rules had ‘minimal’ impact at Greater Trail border crossings, says CBSA

New federal regulations governing cross border shopping have had “minimal” effect at the border in the Greater Trail region

New federal regulations governing cross border shopping have had “minimal” effect at the border in the Greater Trail region, says a Canadian Border Services Agency spokesperson.

Stephanie Waddell said less than one week into the reign of the new regulations it was too early to see if there would be a significant trend developing.

However, for the first weekend of the rise in the duty-free limit — from $50 to $200 on visits of more than 24 hours — there was a slight increase in local traffic volumes compared to the same weekend last year.

For the June 1-3 weekend, there were 597 vehicles crossing the border into Canada from the U.S., and increase of 43 vehicles from the weekend recorded one year ago. From June 3-5, 2011, there were 554 vehicles.

The CBSA officials collected $12,840.71 in duties and taxes this year, a jump of $2,899.95 from the $9,940.76 they collected in duties and taxes last year.

The lack of any change in the same-day exemption — a time period in which most cross border shoppers would do the deed — could offset the impact of the other rule changes on cross-border traffic.

Americans, however, are entitled to $200 worth of exemptions when crossing the border from Canada on a one-day excursion.

On June 1 the federal government approved a rise in the duty-free limit on visits of more than 24 hours, rising from $50 to $200.

Any visit longer than 48 hours allows a Canadian to return with duty-free goods worth up to $800 — up from $400 for up to one week, and $750 for longer than a week. The allowance for duty-free goods remains at zero for stays of less than 24 hours.