Wildfires burning in the western United States are causing higher than normal smoke pollution in many areas of Interior Health. Smoke can worsen symptoms for those who have pre-existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma, allergies and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Smoke can also worsen cardiac disease. People should stay indoors as much as possible, close windows, and limit or eliminate outdoor exercise until the air clears. On the weekend, Jim Bailey captured this haunting image of a stump emerging from the smoke on the Pend D’Oreille. (Jim Bailey photo)

Smoke shrouds September

Smoke from fires south of the border makes everything in the Kootenays appear a bit erie in 2020

Wildfires burning in the Western United States are causing higher than normal smoke pollution in many areas of Interior Health.

Smoke can worsen symptoms for those who have pre-existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma, allergies and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Typical symptoms may include:

· Difficulty breathing

· Chest pain and discomfort

· Coughing

· Irritated eyes, nose, and throat

Smoke can also worsen cardiac disease. Inhaled particles trigger the release of chemical messengers into the blood that may increase the risk of blood clots, angina episodes, heart attacks and strokes. People with chronic cardiac conditions are more susceptible to chest pain, heart attacks, cardiac arrhythmias, acute congestive heart failure or stroke.

If wildfire smoke is triggering mild symptoms individuals should take medications as prescribed and use a rescue inhaler if one has been prescribed. You should not take more medication, or take it more often than prescribed.

If you are near the fires where smoke or particulates are significant, or the smoke is making them sick, consider leaving the area until the air is clear again.

People should stay indoors as much as possible, and close windows if they can.

Limit or eliminate outdoor exercise until the air clears.

Interior Health is also advising schools to:

· Ensure students are situated appropriately apart.

· Keep classroom windows closed.

· Encourage students to wear closely fitted masks, which will provide some protection.

· Restrict outdoor physical education and limit indoor physical education to lower intensity activity,

If you are experiencing symptoms and are concerned, contact your health care provider or walk-in clinic. If your symptoms are severe, seek emergency medical attention.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

Trail Smoke Eaters to host Cranbrook Bucks to open exhibition season

The BCHL announces a 100-plus game exhibition season

Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Sept. 20 to 26

Rabbit Day, Hobbit Day and One-Hit Wonder Day are all coming up this week

Interior Health reports three additional COVID-19 cases in region

The number of cases in the region since the beginning of the pandemic are now at 492

Trail Kiwanians wrap up $10,000 hospital donation

The new KBRH emergency department opened its doors a few weeks ago

LeRoi Foundation donates to hospital in Trail

$5,000 comes to KBRH via Community Foundations Canada and ECSF

B.C. or Ontario? Residential school survivors fight move of court battle

It’s now up to Ontario’s Court of Appeal to sort out the venue question

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Emaciated grizzly found dead on central B.C. coast as low salmon count sparks concern

Grizzly was found on Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw territory in Smith Inlet, 60K north of Port Hardy

Most Read