Public works manager Larry Abenante is keeping tabs on water levels at Trail creeks as the forecast calls for more rain today.

Public works manager Larry Abenante is keeping tabs on water levels at Trail creeks as the forecast calls for more rain today.

Trail monitoring creek levels

Flood advisories in Okanagan and Boundary regions

While some city crews are pulling out the sand bags in preparation for flooding, Trail is keeping a watchful eye on water levels that are regular for this time of year.

“We’re being diligent and keeping an eye on things,” said public works manager Larry Abenante, as he scoped out the level of the Trail Creek by the bocce pits Thursday.

“When I get concerned is when the water is coming over the top rail (of the culvert) and it will do that if there is debris built up, that’s when I get panicky,” he said. “The culvert capacity is more than adequate, it’s when you get debris that starts plugging up and making a dam, that’s when you have a problem.”

Abenante made his rounds to the Trail and

Gorge Creek as well as a tour of the city’s creek channels after participating in a conference-call meeting Thursday facilitated by the Provincial Emergency Program.

The city has 10,000 sand bags in case of an emergency and has contingency plans in place should a disaster strike.

Though Trail is sitting comfortably, other areas in the province are not having as much luck since rivers in southern and southeastern B.C. are rising as heavy rains combine with spring runoff.

The River Forecast Centre has issued flood watches for the Kettle and West Kettle rivers in the southern Okanagan and Boundary region, as well as the Moyie River near Yahk.

Up to 25 millimetres of rain is forecast over southern and southeastern B.C., adding to already runoff-swollen rivers, with water levels expected to rise today.

Trail developed back-up systems at all of its major intakes after the historical Trail flood.

“Back then, both Trail and Gorge Creeks were going and we had a bit of a mud slide on Gorge Creek and that’s what contributed to the flood downtown,” said Abenante. “Trail Creek just kind of hiccupped a little but never did cause any real damage.”

-with files from CP