Year in Review – June

June windstorm barrels through Trail

  • Dec. 29, 2015 5:00 a.m.

June

3 – June gets off to a soggy start with almost 40 millimetres of rain falling in the few days of the month. However, warm temperatures were quick to return.

5 – Trail nurse Braedon Mauro was honoured by the Calgary Police Department with the Exceptional Recognition of Valour for his actions in 2013 while helping an injured motorist in a Calgary traffic accident.

8 – Trail council puts the proposed all-wheel park telephone survey on hold after it decides to apply for a Canada 150 Community Infrastructure grant. However, with the grant application comes the commitment that the park would be built in Gyro Park. Successful grant applicants would be announced in September.

9 – Principals from Trail’s J.L. Crowe Secondary School and Castlegar’s Stanley Humphries Secondary School are discussing moving the graduation ceremonies to the end of the month in future years. Crowe’s principal David DeRosa cited student distractions as the main reason for the potential move.

9 – The bidding process for the new pedestrian/pipe bridge in Trail began with interest from both U.S. and Canadian contractors.

11 – Trail’s public works department plans to inspect the city’s iconic covered staircases to make sure they can absorb the traffic from two events in September, which features participants climbing a the stairs through Trail. Due to the age of the stairs, the department may recommend altering some of the routes.

19 – After 71 years, a U.S. airman will have his remains buried at the Trail Mountain View Cemetery. Sgt. Eric Honeyman, who has family ties to the area, died when his plane crashed in 1944 during World War 2 near Belgium. His remains were discovered in 2009 and DNA testing eventually linked him to relatives in Trail where he was given a military funeral on June 22.

22 – The Village of Salmo will need a byelection after councillors Cathy Paton and Ken Anderson, the top two voter getters in last fall’s municipal election, resigned. No details were released regarding their resignation.

23 – Citing lack of funds, the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary rejected a proposal to help fund a new BC SPCA facility in Trail.

27 – A large fuel spill from a rolled semi forced an eight-hour closure of the Rossland Hill. The semi-trailer was loaded with food items when it went on its side and slid to a stop blocking all lanes on the highway.

27 – Due to the extreme hot and dry weather, fireworks have been cancelled for the annual Canada Day celebrations.

28 – A sudden windstorm left a path of destruction through Trail and communities like Genelle, Castlegar and Nelson. Two towering trees by the Trail Community Health Centre were uprooted while a third had its top snapped off.

29 – A gust front, a weather term for an extreme wind, hit the Trail area leaving a path of destruction, which included uprooted trees in downtown Trail and power outages throughout the region. Several trees were also damaged in Gyro Park and the Sunningdale area.

Just Posted

J. L. Crowe Secondary will host the convocation for 2021 Graduates on Saturday starting at 9 a.m. Photo: Jim Bailey
Convocation goes Saturday with Kootenay Columbia grads in learning groups, no parents

Parents can live-stream the ceremony of their 2021 graduates online

Clarice Tuai, seen in front of the ‘50 Objects for 50 Years’ exhibit, is a summer student for the Trail museum/visitors centre. Photo: Sheri Regnier
Trail museum invites everyone to visit new Doukhobor exhibit

‘50 Objects for 50 Years’ runs until October 1

Students at Creston Valley Secondary School put together an art installation of a replica residential school room. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Creston students create art installation of residential school room

The replica was decorated with a small bed, school uniform, and notes written with pleas for help

A living wage sets a higher standard than the minimum wage; it is what a family needs to earn to provide the basic needs based on the actual costs of living in a community.
Fruitvale now a living wage employer

“I’m really excited that Fruitvale is leading the charge for municipalities locally,” Morissette said.

Black Press file photo
West Kootenay communities behind provincial COVID-19 vaccination rate

Only Trail is at the provincial average for vaccinations

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Thousands of protesters make their way through the downtown core during a Black Lives Matter protest in Ottawa, Friday June 5, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
MPs’ study of systemic racism in policing concludes RCMP needs new model

Chair of the House public safety committee says it’s time for a reckoning on ‘quasi-military’ structure

A case filled with packages of boneless chicken breasts is shown in a grocery store Sunday, May 10, 2020, in southeast Denver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-David Zalubowski
One million chickens euthanized during labour dispute at Quebec slaughterhouse

Premier says waste amounts to 13 per cent of the province’s chicken production thrown in the garbage

Premier of Manitoba Brian Pallister speaks at a news conference at the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Lipnowski
Provincial leaders want more federal money for health care, plan to meet in fall

Premiers ask Ottawa to increase its share of overall health spending to 35 per cent from 22 per cent

A section of the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies is seen west of Cochrane, Alta., Thursday, June 17, 2021. A joint federal-provincial review has denied an application for an open-pit coal mine in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains, saying its impacts on the environment and Indigenous rights aren’t worth the economic benefits it would bring. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Panel says Grassy Mountain coal mine in Alberta Rockies not in public interest

Public hearings on the project in southern Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass region were held last fall

An old growth cedar stands in a cut-block within the Caycuse Valley. More than 100 prominent Canadians, have signed an open letter calling for the immediate protection of all remaining old-growth forests in B.C. (Submitted)
Brian Mulroney and Greta Thunberg among 100 celebrities pushing to save B.C. old growth

List includes Indigenous leaders, scientists, authors, Oscar winners

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on Friday, February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
U.S. border restrictions to remain in place until at least July 21

Safety minister says Canada, U.S. extending restrictions on non-essential international travel

Himalayan Life helped finance the construction of Nepal’s Yangri Academic Centre and dormitories after a 2015 earthquake devastated the valley, killing more than 9,000 people. (Screen grab/Peter Schaeublin)
B.C. charity founder pledges to rebuild Nepalese school swept away by flash floods

Six years after an earthquake killed more than 9,000 people, Nepal faces another catastrophy

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Most Read