Premier Sandy Silver, and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Brendan Hanley at the Government of Yukon COVID-19 press conference in Whitehorse, Yukon on June 2. The Yukon government provided more details on phase two of the reopening plan at a June 24 COVID-19 update. (Alistair Maitland Photography)

Yukon to reopen travel from B.C., N.W.T. and Nunavut on Canada Day

Travellers from B.C. and the other territories will not have to self-isolate if they visit

Come phase two of the Yukon’s reopening plan, residents from British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut will be able to enter the territory without self-isolating for 14 days.

Premier Sandy Silver and the Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley provided more information about phase two, scheduled to begin July 1, during the June 24 COVID-19 update.

Silver announced that B.C., N.W.T. and Nunavut residents will be able to come to the territory effective that date and not be subject to isolation orders. These residents will have to provide some kind of proof of address to show they are from the jurisdiction they claim.

The government has not yet determined what documents will be accepted as proof of address, but Silver said a driver’s licence will be sufficient and that other options are being considered.

He clarified that anyone from these three jurisdictions will only be exempt from isolation orders if they travel directly from their home jurisdiction to the Yukon. If someone from Nunavut had to make stops between the territory and the Yukon, that individual could still be exempt provided the stops were in either N.W.T. or B.C.

“We appreciate that travel from Nunavut would involve a stop, so as long as the travellers are still within the Northwest Territories and British Columbia, that would be acceptable,” Silver said.

Hanley added that these residents will not just be waved through; they will have to sign a declaration stating they do not have symptoms of COVID-19.

Other restrictions that will be lifted for phase two will be the limit of 50 per cent capacity for restaurants. Restaurants will be able to operate at up to 100 per cent capacity, provided physical distancing is still in place.

“If you have the ability to maintain social distancing … then you can do that (full capacity),” Silver said. “It’s just that a lot of restaurants won’t have that ability. They have closed in spaces.”

Updated guidelines for restaurants will be available before phase two begins.

The government is working with the City of Whitehorse to help support restaurants expand outside as another way to increase their capacity.

Public pools with an approved operational plan can reopen in phase two. Plans must be submitted for approval and the Public Health and Safety Act must be adhered to.

Farmers markets will be able to welcome non-food vendors in phase two, but information booths remain prohibited. Markets can also have seating and an outdoors dining area.

Silver also gave some information about phase three. The tentative start for this phase could be as early as July 15. He explained phases could last a couple of weeks to a month depending on the epidemiology of the virus.

This could lead to allowing residents from the remaining provinces access to the Yukon, but the two-week isolation period would remain. More details will be released later on this.

Silver explained the work that needs to be done is making sure communities are ready for the next phase.

Hanley said opening up the territory means being vigilant with spacing, hand washing and other preventative measures.

Contact Gord Fortin at gord.fortin@yukon-news.com

CoronavirusYukon

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Petition calls on referendum for new city hall development in Rossland

The petition sent to the B.C. government has gathered more than 350 signatures

Trail RCMP officer accused of criminal harassment, forcible entry

BCPS: The charges against Murchie date between 2017 and 2020

Trail RCMP safely apprehend man experiencing mental health crisis

A number of frontline agencies were involved in bringing this incident to a peaceful resolve

Trail RCMP, coroner, investigating fisherman’s sudden death

The Maple Ridge man, in his 50s, died while fishing on a bridge near Trail

Speak up for B.C.’s Old Growth

Letter to the Editor from Wildsight

The pandemic is widening Canada’s workplace gender gap

Gender pay gap is incentivizing fathers to work while mothers watch children, a new B.C. study has found

Man found dead on Okanagan trail identified as Hollywood actor

GoFundMe campaign launched for man found dead at summit of Spion Kop

3 people dead in Prince George motel fire

Fire personnel believe the blaze was suspicious although investigation in early stages

B.C. sets terms to review police, mental health, race relations

MLAs to recommend Police Act changes by May 2021

Feds announce $8.3M to deal with ‘ghost’ fishing gear in B.C. waters

Ghost gear accounts for up to 70 per cent of all macro-plastics in the ocean by weight

Almost 99% less land in B.C. burned this year compared to 2018

2018 was the worst year on record for wildfires

B.C. orders Coastal GasLink to stop pipeline construction near protected wetlands

The 670-kilometre pipeline is planned to transport natural gas from northeast B.C. to Kitimat

B.C. tent camps persist as hotels, housing bought for homeless

Current estimate 40 camps, homeless counts stalled by COVID-19

Most Read