Mike Martin will be sworn in as the mayor for the City of Trail on Dec. 1.

Mike Martin will be sworn in as the mayor for the City of Trail on Dec. 1.

New mayors lead wave of change in Greater Trail

Strong voter turnout brings new faces to council chambers

There’s some big changes in local politics following record voter turnouts for the civic election on Saturday.

Almost 50 per cent of Silver City electors cast a ballot that has Mike Martin sitting as Trail mayor for the next four years.

“The community has given us a tremendous mandate,” Martin said Monday afternoon. “And I am absolutely delighted with council, it’s a perfect split of men and women. The first order of business is to set council up as a team with well defined roles and accountability.”

Martin’s council includes incumbents Kevin Jolly (1,871 votes), Robert Cacchioni (1,482 votes) and Eleanor Gattafoni Robinson with 1,294 votes.

The trio of new faces includes Lisa Pasin, who garnered to most votes of all candidates with 2,233, former Trail mayor Sandy Santori (1,322 votes) and Carol Dobie (1,135 votes) who grabbed the final seat on council.

Martin maintains his platform of growth, vitality and pride could have tipped the scales in his favour, along with many months of preparing himself for the role of mayor.

He said there are many matters to work on, starting with recreation and building relationships with neighbouring communities.

“City hall is open for business and with transparency, we will move forward.”

With the referendum on a new library/museum gathering overwhelming support, 61 per cent in favour of the project, Martin said it’s time to listen to the community and review the design of the Trail Riverfront Centre.

“I’ve heard feedback from the community and it’s not what they want to see,” explained Martin. “It’s too industrial for the culture of the town. This is something council will definitely be taking a look at.”

There will also be a new Trail face on the School District 20 board after longtime board member Lorraine Manning was edged out by incumbent Mark Wilson (1,499 votes) and newcomer Terry Hanik, with 1,516 votes.

After losing a seat on the board by 17 votes in the last election, Hanik said he was approached by parents asking him to consider running again.

“People want change so I agree to give it another shot,” he told the Trail Times Monday morning.

“Parents want things to happen and I said if I was elected I’d bring back the trades. I want to make sure the children in our district get the best education possible, and I believe we can make that change if we are all on the same page.”

Another community that opted for big change was Warfield.

About 48 per cent of the village showed up at the polls, and with a landslide assent, first time candidate Ted Pahl was named Warfield mayor.

He was selected to the position with 469 votes over veteran politicians Bill Trewhella (123 votes) and Jim Nelson (81 votes).

Although Pahl won’t be officially sworn into office until Nov. 26, he’s already started his first order of business which is establishing strong relations with neighbouring municipalities.

“I had a face-to-face with Mike Martin and Joe Danchuk,” said Pahl Monday morning. “And I had a good conversation with Kathy Moore.

“We are all in agreement that the recent change in local government brings opportunity for renewed relations and the building blocks for stronger partnerships.”

First thing on Pahl’s list is to re-open dialogue on a long term recreation deal with the City of Trail.

One that is fair an agreeable to both parties, he added.

Village council also has three new faces including rookies Diane Langman (524 votes) and Shane Ferraro (455 votes) and past Warfield Coun. Brett Rakuson with 401 votes.

Incumbent Tom Milne completes the four-seat council with 302 votes.

Locally, the biggest change of leadership is in Salmo.  An almost 60 per cent voter turnout gave the village council a clean sweep.

First time candidate Stephen White won the mayoral seat with 245 votes, with newcomers, Ken Anderson, Cathy Paton, Steven Dimock and Dan Danforth filling the four council seats.

Big news from Rossland is Kathy Moore’s landslide victory as the city’s new mayor with 1,240 votes against opponent Jill Spearn’s 363 votes.

An unusual result, a tie between Tim Thatcher and John Greene, each with 788 votes, means only five of the six councillor spots, pending a judicial recount, were filled Monday.

With an almost 60 per cent turnout, Aaron Cosbey (1294 votes), Marten Kruysse (1,276), Andrew Zwicker (1,275), Andrew Morel (1,233) and Lloyd McLellan (948) won the other five council seats.

With only 444 votes, Rossland’s current mayor Greg Granstrom did not win a seat on council.

Voter turnout in the Beaver Valley communities was considerably less than neighbouring communities, though only one municipality had a race for top seat.

About 39 per cent of electors gave Joe Danchuk the thumbs up for another term with 226 votes against former village mayor Griff Welsh, who finished with 107 votes.

Newcomers Rory Steep and Mark Reid will join incumbents Cindy Cook and Mary Gay.

With no mayor’s race in Fruitvale, only 390 people cast a ballot from a pool of 1,722 eligible electors, according to civicinfo.bc.ca.

Steve Morissette had the most votes, (366) and will sit alongside first time candidate James Ellison (257) and incumbents Bert Kniss and Tabatha Webber.

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