Warfield’s first harvest picking day goes in the community hall on Saturday, Sept. 25. Photo: Kayla Smith

Warfield’s first harvest picking day goes in the community hall on Saturday, Sept. 25. Photo: Kayla Smith

Warfield to host first harvest picking day

Residents will get a flyer in their mailbox outlining the steps to register for the Sept. 25 event

Warfield is readying to host the village’s inaugural Harvest Rescue Picking Day on Saturday, Sept. 25.

“Our intent for this event is to gather surplus produce and fruit from the community to prevent waste, and then give that food to people who can use it,” explains village councillor Cyra Yunkws, chair of the Warfield food advisory committee.

“There may be people who would like to pick fruit, and there may be people who have trees they would like picked,” she added.

“We will ask pickers and growers to register, then on Sept 25, we will send pickers to the growers’ homes.”

The produce will be divided with a third going to the grower, one third to the picker and then remaining bounty will be donated to a local food bank.

Yunkws said village residents will be getting a flyer in their mailbox outlining the steps to register.

The home base for this first harvest day is the Warfield Community Hall, with picking to begin at 10 a.m.

All residents are also welcome to drop-by the square to pick up a free set of seeds to create a pollinator patch, plus recipe cards and supplies to make apple crisp and apple sauce.

The community event is being organized by the Warfield food advisory committee, which was established last fall.

Volunteer members have initiated a number of activities including a garden contest and the planting of community vegetable beds.

For more information on the committee visit their Facebook page @WarfieldFoodAdvisoryCommittee.

Read more: Trust projects aim for meaningful environmental impact

Read more: Invasive plants wreaking havoc on Annable bridge and Trail Creek



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

AgricultureKootenays